Fast Food Nation

The words trusted friend were never to be mentioned

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Unformatted text preview: ce,” another warned. Consumer research indicated that future sales in some key areas were at risk. “More customers are telling us,” an executive wrote, “that McDonald’s is a big company that just wants to sell… sell as much as it can.” An emotional connection to McDonald’s that customers had formed “as toddlers” was now eroding. The new radio and television advertising had to make people feel that McDonald’s still cared about them. It had to link the McDonald’s of today to the one people loved in the past. “The challenge of the campaign,” wrote Ray Bergold, the chain’s top marketing executive, “is to make customers believe that McDonald’s is their ‘Trusted Friend.’” According to these documents, the marketing alliances with other brands were intended to create positive feelings about McDonald’s, making consumers associate one thing they liked with another. Ads would link the company’s french fries “to the excitement and fanaticism people feel about the NBA.” The feelings of pride inspired by the Olympics would be used in ads to help launch a new hamburger with more meat than th...
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2014 for the course MGMT 120 taught by Professor Litt during the Spring '08 term at UCLA.

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