Fast Food Nation

There were chains with futuristic names like the

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Unformatted text preview: uit and a black string tie. By the early 1960s, Kentucky Fried Chicken was the largest restaurant chain in the United States, and Colonel Sanders was a household name. In his autobiography, Life As I Have Known It Has Been “Finger-lickin’ Good,” Sanders described his ups and downs, his decision at the age of seventy-four to be rebaptized and born again, his lifelong struggle to stop cursing. Despite his best efforts and a devout faith in Christ, Harland Sanders admitted that it was still awfully hard “not to call a no-good, lazy, incompetent, dishonest s.o.b. by anything else but his rightful name.” For every fast food idea that swept the nation, there were countless others that flourished briefly — or never had a prayer. There were chains with homey names, like Sandy’s, Carrol’s, Henry’s, Winky’s, and Mr. Fifteen’s. There were chains with futuristic names, like the Satellite Hamburger System and Kelly’s Jet System. Most of all, there were chains named after their main dish: Burger Chefs, Burger Queens, Burgerv...
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2014 for the course MGMT 120 taught by Professor Litt during the Spring '08 term at UCLA.

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