Fast Food Nation

Fast Food Nation

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Unformatted text preview: ed in a nearby slot. This Miracle Insta Machine proved overly complex, frequently malfunctioned, and was eventually abandoned by the Burger King chain. The fast food wars in southern California — the birthplace of Jack in the Box, as well as McDonald’s, Taco Bell, and Carl’s Jr. — were especially fierce. One by one, most of the old drive-ins closed, unable to compete against the less expensive, self-service burger joints. But Carl kept at it, opening new restaurants up and down the state, following the new freeways. Four of these freeways — the Riverside, the Santa Ana, the Costa Mesa, and the Orange — soon passed through Anaheim. Although Carl’s Jr. was a great success, a few of Carl’s other ideas should have remained on the drawing board. Carl’s Whistle Stops featured employees dressed as railway workers, “Hobo Burgers,” and toy electric trains that took orders to the kitchen. Three were built in 1966 and then converted to Carl’s Jr. restaurants a few years later. A cof...
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2014 for the course MGMT 120 taught by Professor Litt during the Spring '08 term at UCLA.

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