Fast Food Nation

Progress in 1976 the new headquarters of carl karcher

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Unformatted text preview: fee shop chain with a Scottish theme also never found its niche. The waitresses at “Scot’s” wore plaid skirts, and the dishes had unfortunate names, such as “The Clansman.” The leading fast food chains spread nationwide; between 1960 and 1973, the number of McDonald’s restaurants grew from roughly 250 to 3,000. The Arab oil embargo of 1973 gave the fast food industry a bad scare, as long lines at gas stations led many to believe that America’s car culture was endangered. Amid gasoline shortages, the value of McDonald’s stock fell. When the crisis passed, fast food stock prices recovered, and McDonald’s intensified its efforts to open urban, as well as suburban, restaurants. Wall Street invested heavily in the fast food chains, and corporate managers replaced many of the early pioneers. What had begun as a series of small, regional businesses became a fast food industry, a major component of the American economy. progress IN 1976, THE NEW HEADQUARTERS of Carl Karcher Enterprises, Inc. (CKE...
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