Current data suggest that improvements in the design

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: lped make the case for the law. Current data suggest that improvements in the design and distribution of equipment are making a positive impact on the incidence of needlesticks. Many references are provided that will direct the reader to data that is continuously updated and reflects current science. Some of the websites cited are continuously monitoring the epidemiology of these injuries and should be used in current discussions of the subject. 3 Figure 1. Hollow-bore needles and other devices associated with percutaneous injuries in CDC surveillance hospitals, by % total percutaneous injuries (n=4,951), June 1995-July 1999. Other Sharp 6% Phlebotomy Needle 4% Winged-Steel Needle 13% Other Hollow-Bore Needle 10% Suture Needle 15% Hypodermic Needle 29% Glass 17% IV Stylet 6% (NIOSH, 1999) Figure 2. Causes of percutaneous injuries with hollow-bore needles in CDC surveillance hospitals, by % total percutaneous injuries (n=3,057), June 1995-July 1999 9(NIOSH, 1999). Handling/Transferring Specimens 5% Other 4% Recapping 5% Manipulating Needle in Patient 27% Collision with HCW or Sharp 8% IV Line-Related Causes 8% Disposal-Related Causes 12% Improper Disposal 10% Cleanup 11% Handling /Passing 11% (NIOSH, 1999) 4 HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission From Infected Patients to Health Care Workers: While the transmission rate of occupationally acquired HIV remains very low, AIDS is a debilitating and ultimately fatal disease, making each potential exposure a frightening...
View Full Document

This document was uploaded on 02/27/2014 for the course ENGLISH 101 at Montgomery College.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online