safety-in-academic-chemistry-laboratories-students

36 students short index 11503 1245 pm page 37 appendix

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Unformatted text preview: glass. Then, while wearing protective gloves, clean the contaminated area with soap and water, and mop it dry. Place a warning sign that says “Wet and slippery floor,” or sprinkle some absorbent on the spot. However, note that vermiculite, kitty litter, and some other absorbents can create a slipping hazard if scattered on a wet surface. 36 students short index 1/15/03 12:45 PM Page 37 Appendix 1. The Web as a Source of Safety Information The Web offers many safety resources. Unfortunately, many contain a mixture of accurate and inaccurate information. A few are outright unreliable, being little more than expressions of ill-founded opinions concerning chemical safety matters and the environment. Recommended Websites The ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety’s (CHAS) webpage is accessible through the ACS website at chemistry.org (click on Tech Divisions, then Division Home Pages). The latter site links to other safety websites that have been evaluated and found to be reasonably reliable by CHAS members who have reviewed them and found the chemical safety information there generally sound. This site links to federal agencies that promulgate safety-related regulations and to foundations, companies, and other societies that have an interest in chemical safety. Click on the link to OSHA, or go directly to www.osha.gov for a current outline of what is happening in OSHA, including statistics, a description of the agency, its Newsroom (speeches, news releases, testimony, publications), and OSHA regulations. Of special interest are Standards—29 CFR (indicating that they were published in Volume 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Section “1910.1450—Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories,” known more commonly as the “Laboratory Standards,” is of particular relevance. To find this information, enter “1910.1450” in the search field. Other Useful Sites ● ● ● ● The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, www.ccohs.ca The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, www.epa.gov The National Instit...
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This document was uploaded on 02/27/2014 for the course PHYS 1B at UCSD.

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