2158_w12_er - General Certificate of Education Ordinary Level 2158 History World Affairs 1917-1991 November 2012 Principal Examiner Report for

2158_w12_er - General Certificate of Education Ordinary...

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General Certificate of Education Ordinary Level 2158 History: World Affairs 1917-1991 November 2012 Principal Examiner Report for Teachers © 2012 HISTORY: WORLD AFFAIRS 1917-1991 Paper 2158/01 Paper 1 General comment There were very few attempts at Questions 3, 6, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21, 24, 26, 30, 31 . Apart from those limitations there was a broad spread of work across the remaining questions, with as ever somewhat less attention given to Section E . There was some excellent work offered by many candidates in this examination. Such work displayed broad and accurate knowledge, purposefully angled to the requirements of the question and displaying thereby in many cases the qualities expected of a Grade A candidate. It is worth pausing on those whose achievement was less impressive in order to detect means by which their performance in the examination might have been improved. It is a common place in reports of this kind for the complaint to be heard that some candidates had not read the question closely enough and had hence produced answers with varying degrees of irrelevance. It is thus vital to detect the direction of the question from such indicative words as ‘outline’, ‘describe’, ‘why’, ‘explain’ and to ensure that any quotation in the question (such as in the popular Questions 8 and 18 in this paper) is given due emphasis. But in this examination a number of candidates did not observe two other features in the questions: the number of sub-answers that are required and the time frame of questions. Thus, in the first of these, Question 1 required candidates to give attention to three of the five agencies offered, but a surprising number gave attention to all five. In such cases, all are marked and the best permitted to the required number; no marks are therefore specifically lost, but such practice is a waste of the candidate’s time. In the second case, it is vital to detect the period of time which is the focus of the question. Question 7 was concerned with the years before Hitler acquired power, but a number of candidates dwelt on his time after securing power. Question 8 terminated in 1925, but some candidates continued up to the Second World War, while others misplaced the March on Rome in the second part. There are other less salient instances referred to in the more specific comments below. Attention to the points referred to in this paragraph could well have assisted a number of candidates towards a better result. The report on the previous examination, June 2012, commented on the good use of time in balancing five answers within the two-and-a-half hours and on the absence of rushed or incomplete work. That trend was also to be found in this examination. The use of distinguishing letters for sub-questions and of a line gap or some other indication before the last part of the question is attempted were also generally evident this time and assist candidates in making their presentation orderly and clear.

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