[BIO 1306] Ch57_Lecture

[BIO 1306] Ch57_Lecture - 57 Conservation Biology 57...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
57 Conservation Biology
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
57 Conservation Biology 57.1 What Is Conservation Biology? 57.2 How Do Biologists Predict Changes in Biodiversity? 57.3 What Factors Threaten Species Survival? 57.4 What Strategies Do Conservation Biologists Use?
Image of page 2
57.1 What Is Conservation Biology? Conservation biology is an applied science, devoted to preserving the diversity of life. Conservation biology is integrated with other disciplines, using knowledge from genetics, evolution, population ecology, biogeography, wildlife management, economics, and sociology.
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
57.1 What Is Conservation Biology? Conservation biology is a normative discipline; it embraces certain values and applies scientific methods to achieve goals related to those values. Conservation biologists are motivated by the belief that loss of biodiversity is negative. Although scientists are supposed to be neutral, most applied sciences are normative. The scientists must still adhere to standard scientific methods.
Image of page 4
57.1 What Is Conservation Biology? Conservation biology is guided by the following three principles: Evolution is the process that unites all of biology. The ecological world is dynamic. Humans are part of ecosystems.
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
57.1 What Is Conservation Biology? Human beings have caused extinctions of other species for thousands of years. When humans first arrived in North America 20,000 years ago, they probably caused the extinction of large mammals such as camels, horses, mammoths, and giant sloths. A similar extinction occurred in Australia 40,000 years ago.
Image of page 6
Figure 57.1 Extinct Australian Megafauna
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
57.1 What Is Conservation Biology? When Polynesian people settled Hawaii 2,000 years ago, they exterminated at least 39 endemic species of birds (species found nowhere else in the world).
Image of page 8
57.1 What Is Conservation Biology? But the current extinction situation is unique. For the first time, all major environmental changes on Earth are human induced, and we are aware of what we are doing.
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
57.1 What Is Conservation Biology? Why do we value biodiversity? We depend on other species for food, fiber, and medicines. Species are necessary for the functioning of ecosystems which provide us with so many goods and services. We derive enormous aesthetic pleasure from watching and interacting with other species.
Image of page 10
57.1 What Is Conservation Biology? Extinctions deprive us of the opportunity for scientific study and understanding ecological interactions. Extinctions raise many ethical concerns; all species are judged to have intrinsic value.
Image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
57.2 How Do Biologists Predict Changes in Biodiversity? Scientists cannot accurately predict the number of extinctions in the coming century for four reasons: The number of species currently on Earth is unknown. We do not know exactly where species live.
Image of page 12
57.2 How Do Biologists Predict Changes in Biodiversity?
Image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern