019 0004 0025 0013 0016 0021 0025 0027 0015 0023 0015

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: by phone Reference group: no message Valence Ideology Ideology Double by mail by phone by mail by phone Double by mail Turnout -0.011 [0.031] -0.000 [0.015] 0.013 [0.011] 0.010 [0.013] -0.006 [0.009] -0.006 [0.013] Incumbent share 0.041** [0.019] 0.004 [0.025] 0.013 [0.016] 0.021 [0.025] 0.027* [0.015] -0.023 [0.015] Incumbent parties 0.032* [0.018] 0.018 [0.023] 0.015 [0.016] 0.029 [0.026] 0.021 [0.014] -0.015 [0.015] Units: 95 precincts. OLS coe¢ cients reported. Robust standard errors clustered at the polling place level in brackets. Kendall, Nannicini & Trebbi (2014): “How Do Voters Respond to Information?” Motivation Empirical model Experimental design Reduced-form results Model estimation Conclusion To get an idea Some evidence of bene…cial e¤ect of valence message by phone calls: 4.1 percentage points, i.e. +8% Estimates are rather imprecise (95 obs.) and the e¤ect of this treatment is not statistically di¤erent from other treatments However, with respect to control group: Phone calls (any type) increase incumbent share by 2.7 percentage points (p-value: 0.019)...
View Full Document

This document was uploaded on 02/26/2014 for the course ECON 544 at The University of British Columbia.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online