moon2 - Rob Schisgall Lab 13 Astronomy Lab Lab 13 The moon...

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Unformatted text preview: Rob Schisgall Lab 13 Astronomy Lab Lab 13 The moon appears bigger when it is near the horizon than directly up in the sky. Many theories have been proposed to explain this difference, and this hypothesis proposes that the phenomenon is caused by a change in the distance between the moon and the observation point. The two main reasons for this illusion are the brains way of perceiving foreground objects as closer, and the curvature of earth. This illusion is based on the brains tendency to adjust an image in order to seem “right.” For example, imagine a picture of railroad tracks coming from the horizon. When two identical colored bars are across the tracks at a close point and a far point, the one that is near will appear smaller. This is because of the relation between the bar and the apparent size of the tracks, see figure 1. Figure 1...
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course ASTR 102 taught by Professor N/a during the Spring '08 term at Dartmouth.

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moon2 - Rob Schisgall Lab 13 Astronomy Lab Lab 13 The moon...

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