Module_3_Pioneers

Airmail 1918 congress approved 100000 appropriation

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Unformatted text preview: July 21 1916 – Congress approved limited funding, $50,000, for the establishment of a trial 1916 airmail route. airmail 1918 – Congress approved $100,000 appropriation for the purchase, operation, and 1918 maintenance of airplanes for use by the US Postal Service. maintenance 1918 - Initial operations began using planes and pilots of the Army Signal Corps. 1918 May 15, 1918 - First test flight scheduled to be flown by Lt. George Boyle between Washington, DC, and New York. Boyle got lost but the mail eventually got through. Washington, Otto Praeger, the Second Assistant Postmaster General of the United States, Otto supported airmail and believed it would prove the use of airplanes for commercial purposes. purposes. August 10, 1918 - The Army experiment ended with an 88% record of completion of August flights attempted. 11 ASCI 254 – Module 3: Pioneers Airmail Timeline Initial airmail operations began 1918 First airmail service began 1918 – August 12 Transcontinental route completed 1920 – Sept 8 Congress approved funding for lighting system 1923 Regularly scheduled transcontinental airmail service began 1924 – July 21 August 12, 1918 - The world’s first August regularly scheduled airmail service began between New York and Washington. Washington. May 15, 1919 - Service began between May Cleveland and Chicago which became the first segment of a transcontinental airmail route. airmail July 1, 1919 - Service between New July York and Cleveland was established. York 1919 - The original Jennys gave way to 1919 the de Havilland DH-4s with more power and performance, in their Liberty engines. engines. 12 ASCI 254 – Module 3: Pioneers Airmail Timeline Initial airmail operations began 1918 First airmail service began 1918 – August 12 Transcontinental route completed 1920 – Sept 8 Congress approved funding for lighting system 1923 Regularly scheduled transcontinental airmail service began 1924 – July 21 1919 - Flying and navigation were extremely primitive with no maps, 1919 standardized instruments, and flights only during daylight hours. Two incapacities hampered the early airmail service: incapacities •Lack of instruments to fly “blind” •Lack of any navigational infrastructure by which airpla...
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This document was uploaded on 03/03/2014 for the course ASCI 254 at Embry-Riddle FL/AZ.

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