Lab report Intro to chemistry

Lab report Intro to chemistry - W""W" Farmed 5...

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Unformatted text preview: W" "W"? Farmed 5 In this lab, the types of acids commonly found in rain due to air pollutants was recreated and the pH value monitored. A few examples of sources that often are the cause of acid rain would be automobile exhaust and the burning of coal- that contains impurities (Lab). Acid rain can be harmful to people's health. the forests, lakes and streams, and even buildings and artifacts as well (egagov, no date). When rainwater is too acidic it can go so far as killing freshwater fish and damaging crops (Casiday & Fray. n.d.). That is My it is so important to test the water for it's pH levels and monitor this to know how dangerous and unclean it really is so that necessary precautions can be taken to further prevent acidic water and to clean the water. Initially. the experiment started by taking three solid powders- NaN02, NaHCOS, NaHSO3- and mixing them each. individually with HCl to create a reaction that would turn the solids into the three gases needed. From mixing the solid substance of NaNO2 with HCl, nitrogen dioxide (N02) gas was made; the similar occurrence took place with the others: NaH003 made carbon dioxide (002) and NaHSOS made sulfur dioxide ($02) gas. Next. the gases that were created in each were drawn out of their current container with individual pipets labeled for each specific product. Simultaneously. the pipets- containing each gas- were then placed into their own test tube of water alongside with the Vernier pH sensor. While holding the test tube, full of water. and the pH sensor and pipet of gas in the water, the gas was released into the water and the pH values were monitored and recorded on a graph using the LoggerPro and Vernier computer interface system (Lab, n.d ). Based on the data collected from observing the pH balance of the acids produced. nitrogen dioxide had the highest pH (8.86), next was sulfur dioxide (6.13). and the lowest was carbon dioxide (5.83). In reality. despite how the numbers make it appear. carbon dioxide is the most acidic. due to the fact that the lower pH the more acidic (Casiday & Fray. no date) There was not a grand change in the initial pH and the final pH values recorded, this is evident when looking at the data table in the index. From the information recorded. the conclusio . sane to tt...; carbon dioxide. which initially forms carbonic acid. is very acidic- like stated ea . It is also the primary source of acidity in unpolluted rainwater (Casiday & F ‘: - . . Carbon dioxide is speculated to cause rainfall in unpolluted air to have a pH value less than 7. sometimes even as low as 5.6 (Lab). This explains why the pH value came out to be the way it did; the initial was 5.74 and final was 5.83. There were some technical difficulties run into when working the computer interface system when trying to record the data; therefore, CO2 had to be recreated and rerecorded on the system. This was due to using the system and pH sensor for the first time. Sulfur dioxide, $02. was the second most acidic in the experiment. It had a pH of 6.13. Sulfuric is a very strong acid (Casiday & Fray, n.d.). Power plants are often the major source for releasing sulfur dioxide into the air when fossil fuels are burned. For example, coal is a major one when trying to make electricity (epa.ggv, n.d). 802 can be produced by natural biological means, but for the most part is generated by "human activity" (Casiday & Fray. n.d.). Lastly was the least acidic, nitrous oxide. It was recorded with a pH of 8.86. This gas often is emitted from car engines and power plants- anything with high-temperature air combustion (Casiday & Fray, n.d.) There are steps that can be taken to help prevent and better the problem with acid rain. Energy can be conserved by turning off lights, tv, and other electronic devices when not being used; this helps because energy production is a major cause of the pollutants that lead up to acid rain. Also. car pooling or public transportation is an option because trucks and cars cause great amounts of nitrogen oxides (egagov, n.d.) A research question that came to mind was "Are there any laws being worked or pushed up through the government to make some of these steps and precautions mandatory or more available?" In further research, it would be best to familiarize yourself with your equipment beforehand, rather than jumping in. The directions were detailed, but their were still problems when interacting with all of the systems functions and locating what was needed to complete a task within the system. Also, I would suggest better organization‘ and materials. The type of material of pipets and other things that were provided made the tasks very difficult and there was quite a bit discrepancy between what the instmctor said to do and the directions; therefore, more unity on what needs to be performed would be ideal. Lastly, when later going back to work on and analyze the data, there was the realization that the data table may be corrupted; it was not specified in the instructions whether the initial pH value was to be recorded before emitting the gas into the water or as you begin to release the gas into the water. This effects what the number is greatly and changes the change in the pH value as well. Bibliography: Casiday and Regina Fray, Rachel. Acid Rain: Inorganic Reactions Experiment. Washington University: Department of Chemistry. EPA: United States Environmental Protection Agency. Acid Rain. Available: epa.gov. Lab: Acid Rain. Chemistry with Vernier. Appendix: _ Data and Calculation Table 1'12sz . . twat, 7;; - a_+—-~ 2; i... 5 __..._. . . . _. _ . N" 8.81 8.86 0.05 3063 5.74 25.83 0.09 .w—v- Cr h o? 9 Values recorded on he time as was .6 ant Mnfinflflflfl. u. “Hui —_I(I{ :nuunn nnu IM‘VIITI fl.1...fldr..1.W.I..I.I1r...r. unnnnuunuuunn-nnuau ...
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