This report provides a broad tutorial overview of the

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: mance information along with illustrations are also included. This report provides a broad tutorial overview of the CCSDS TM Synchronization and Channel Coding and is aimed at helping first-time readers to understand the Recommended Standard. It is not intended to provide all necessary knowledge for successfully designing telemetry communication links. In no event will CCSDS or its members be liable for any incidental, consequential, or indirect damages, including any lost profits, lost savings, or loss of data, or for any claim by another party related to errors or omissions in this report. This document is a CCSDS informational Report and is therefore not to be taken as a CCSDS Recommended Standard. The actual Recommended Standard is in reference [3]. 1.2 SCOPE The concepts, protocols and data formats developed for the TM Synchronization and Channel Coding described herein are designed for space communications links, primarily between spacecraft and ground elements. Data formats are designed with efficiency as a primary consideration; i.e., format overhead is minimized. The results reflect the consensus of experts from many space agencies. This document provides supporting and descriptive material only: it is not part of the Recommended Standard. In the event of any conflict between the TM Synchronization and Channel Coding Recommended Standard (reference [3]) and the material presented herein, the Recommended Standard shall prevail. 1.3 ORGANIZATION An overview of the CCSDS Telemetry System is presented in section 2, which introduces the notion of architectural layering to achieve transparent and reliable delivery of scientific and engineering sensor data (generated aboard remote space vehicles) to the users located in space or on Earth. CCSDS 130.1-G-1 Page 1-1 June 2006 TM SYNCHRONIZATION AND CHANNEL CODING —SUMMARY OF CONCEPT AND RATIONALE Section 3 introduces the elements of TM Synchronization and Channel Coding and the specific codes considered in the CCSDS TM Synchronization and Channel Coding Recommended Standard (reference [3]). Subsequent sections describe in detail the characteristics, performance, and rationale of the four classes of codes considered: convolutional, Reed-Solomon, concatenated, and turbo codes. Annex A presents a Glossary in order to familiarize the reader with the terminology used throughout the CCSDS Telemetry System. Annex B is a list of acronyms and abbreviations. Annex C presents some rationale for turbo code parameter selection. 1.4 REFERENCES [1] Procedures Manual for the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems. CCSDS A00.0-Y-9. Yellow Book. Issue 9. Washington, D.C.: CCSDS, November 2003. [2] TM Space Data Link Protocol. Recommendation for Space Data System Standards, CCSDS 132.0-B-1. Blue Book. Issue 1. Washington, D.C.: CCSDS, September 2003. [3] TM Synchronization and Channel Coding. Recommendation for Space Data System Standards, CCSDS 131.0-B-1. Blue Book. Issue 1. Washington, D.C.: CCSDS, September 2003. [4] Information Technology—Open Systems Interconnection—Basic Reference Model: The Basic Model. International Standard, ISO/IEC 7498-1. 2nd ed. Geneva: ISO, 1994. [5] AOS Space Data Link Protocol. Recommendation for Space Data System Standards, CCSDS 732.0-B-2. Blue Book. Issue 2. Washington, D.C.: CCSDS, July 2006. [6] Lossless Data Compression. Report Concerning Space Data System Standards, CCSDS 120.0-G-1. Green Book. Issue 1. Washington, D.C.: CCSDS, May 1997. [7] Space Packet Protocol. Recommendation for Space Data System Standards, CCSDS 133.0-B-1. Blue Book. Issue 1. Washington, D.C.: CCSDS, September 2003. [8] C. E. Shannon. “A Mathematical Theory of Communication,” Bell System Technical Journal 27 (July and October, 1948): 379-423, 623-656. [9] J. P. Odenwalder. Concatenated Reed-Solomon/Viterbi Channel Coding for Advanced Planetary Missions, Final Report. Contract 953866, December 1, 1974. [10] K. Y. Liu. The Effects of Receiver Tracking Phase Error on the Performance of Concatenated Reed-Solomon/Viterbi Channel Coding System. JPL Publication 81-62. Pasadena, California: NASA-Jet Propulsion Laboratory, September 1, 1981. CCSDS 130.1-G-1 Page 1-2 June 2006 TM SYNCHRONIZATION AND CHANNEL CODING —SUMMARY OF CONCEPT AND RATIONALE [11] J. P. Odenwalder et al. Hybrid Coding Systems Study, Final Report. NASA-Ames Research Center Contract NAS2-6722. San Diego, California: Linkabit Corporation, September 1972. [12] M. Perlman and J. J. Lee. Reed-Solomon Encoders—Conventional vs. Berlekamp’s Architecture. JPL Publication 82-71. Pasadena, California: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, December 1, 1982. [13] U. Cheng. “Node Synchronization of Viterbi Decoders Using State Metrics.” TDA Progress Report 42-94, April-June 1988 (August 15, 1988): 201-209. <http://tmo.jpl.nasa.gov/tmo/progress_report/42-94/94P.PDF> [14] D. Divsalar and F. Pollara. “Turbo Codes for Deep-Space Communications.” TDA Progress Report 42-120, October-December 1994 (February 15, 19...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online