Lecture 9

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: leon Crossing the St. Bernard Pass, c.1801, by Jacques-Louis David Differing views of the French Revolution The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution Daron Acemoglu, Davide Cantoni, Simon Johnson, James Robinson Introduction Historical background Cross-country evidence Within-Germany Evidence Reforms in Germany Conclusion The Shootings of May 3rd 1808 by Francisco Goya The French Revolution as a Natural Experiment Interesting historical experiment for looking at these questions and related issues because the institutions that the French imposed are central to many debates Imposition of the Civil Code (Shleifer et al.). Introduction of equality before the law. Basic to social mobility and innovation. Abolition of feudal and mercantilist institutions such as guilds. Institutionalist literature would see these as prime candidates for dysfunctional institutions (Olson). Land redistribution from Catholic Church and aristocracy (Tawney). The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution Daron Acemoglu, Davide Cantoni, Simon Johnson, James Robinson Introduction Historical background Cross-country evidence Within-Germany Evidence Reforms in Germany Conclusion The French Revolution as a Natural Experiment Interesting historical experiment for looking at these questions and related issues because the institutions that the French imposed are central to many debates Imposition of the Civil Code (Shleifer et al.). Introduction of equality before the law. Basic to social mobility and innovation. Abolition of feudal and mercantilist institutions such as guilds. Institutionalist literature would see these as prime candidates for dysfunctional institutions (Olson). Land redistribution from Catholic Church and aristocracy (Tawney). French institutions did not evolve organically, were ‘inappropriate’ and implemented ‘Big Bang’ style. Did places which were reformed by the French do relatively better economically in the 19th century? The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution Daron Acemoglu, Davide Cantoni, Simon Johnson, James Robinson Introduction Historical background Cross-country evidence Within-Germany Evidence Reforms in Germany Conclusion Preview of Results The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution Daron Acemoglu, Davide Cantoni, Simon Johnson, James Robinson We look at 2 possible datasets: 1. Europe’s urbanization rates, 2. German urbanization rates. We distinguish 3 forms of treatment: 1. Length of French occupation (in years), 2. a dummy for French control during the Revolutionary period, 3. a dummy for French control during the Napoleonic period. Introduction Historical background Cross-country evidence Within-Germany Evidence Reforms in Germany Conclusion Preview of Results The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution Daron Acemoglu, Davide Cantoni, Simon Johnson, James Robinson First look at reduced-form relationships between treatment and dependent variables. We find quite robust evidence that by 1900 treated places grow fas...
View Full Document

This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014 for the course ECON 2328 at Harvard.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online