Is this why welfare states often expand after wars

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Unformatted text preview: lly e¢ cient decisions. Is this why welfare states often expand after wars? James A. Robinson (Harvard) The Emergence of Modern Economic Growth: A Comparative and Historical Analysis8 October 7, 2009 7/ Source: de Vries, Jan and Ad van der Woude (1997) The First Modern Economy, p.22. Source: de Vries, Jan and Ad van der Woude (1997) The First Modern Economy, p.30. Dissemination was not Automatic The Dutch got stuck, maybe because they could not construct an e¤ective central state. Recall my discussion of the rise of the state in Britain. England was a strong centralized polity back in the Middle Ages, which is a large di¤erence to the small states that made up the United Provinces of the Netherlands. After the British industrial revolution the spread of the industrial revolution even in Western Europe was not an automatic process. Something that greatly facilitated it was the French Revolution. James A. Robinson (Harvard) The Emergence of Modern Economic Growth: A Comparative and Historical Analysis8 October 7, 2009 8/ The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution Daron Acemoglu Davide Cantoni James Robinson Simon Johnson Daron Acemoglu, Davide Cantoni, Simon Johnson, James Robinson Introduction Historical background Cross-country evidence Within-Germany Evidence Reforms in Germany NBER Summer Institute, July 2009 Conclusion Introduction Large consensus about the importance of institutions for economic development, but uncertainty about which specific institutions are important. Also little consensus on how institutions change, whether they can be designed, or if they can be reformed externally. Some argue that institutions have to evolve organically (Hayek). Some argue that institutions have to be ‘appropriate’ (Berkovitz et al., Rodrik). ‘Big Bang’ or gradual reform? The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution Daron Acemoglu, Davide Cantoni, Simon Johnson, James Robinson Introduction Historical background Cross-country evidence Within-Germany Evidence Reforms in Germany Conclusion Exogenous imposition of institutions? Disillusion with the experience of institutional reform in Latin America, Africa or former Soviet Union. But also examples of previous success, for instance Germany and Japan after World War II. Rare occurrences of exogenous imposition of reforms Therefore focus on quasi-experiments, such as colonial origins and settler mortality (Acemoglu, Johnson, Robinson 2001) After 1792 French armies invaded and changed/reformed the institutions of many European countries. The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution Daron Acemoglu, Davide Cantoni, Simon Johnson, James Robinson Introduction Historical background Cross-country evidence Within-Germany Evidence Reforms in Germany Conclusion Differing views of the French Revolution The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution Daron Acemoglu, Davide Cantoni, Simon Johnson, James Robinson Introduction Historical background Cross-country evidence Within-Germany Evidence Reforms in Germany Conclusion Napo...
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This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014 for the course ECON 2328 at Harvard.

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