The red line marks the borders of the country that

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Unformatted text preview: orical map of Italy at around year 1167 The figure shows the map of Italy at around year 1167. The red line marks the borders of the country that where the Holy Roman Empire of Germany. All the towns marked with a full dot were commune. Towns in red were commune that belonged to the Lombard League, those in blue were allied to the Emperor. The green areas mark the territories of various Principati and Feudi. The Southern part of Italy not belonging to the Empire was under the Norman Kingdom of Sicily. http://www.scuola.com/storialocale/medioevo.htlm 38 Figure 3. Orvieto’s strategic advantage A picture of Orvieto, showing the superior military location of the capital of the Etruscan nation 40 Measuring Social Capital This follows Putnam, they collect data on the number of non-pro…t associations present in a town in 2000 and the turn out in referenda (where people cannot give preference votes...). They also look at whether the city had an organ donor’ organization. s James A. Robinson (Harvard) The Emergence of Modern Economic Growth: A Comparative and Historical Analysis September 16, 2008 16 / 24 Results #1 They …rst …nd whether or not a city was a commune in the middle ages is positively correlated with measures of social capital, though this is not completely robust. They then (Table 8) estimate a …rst-stage regression where they show that the potential sources of variation do indeed predict which cities became communes. James A. Robinson (Harvard) The Emergence of Modern Economic Growth: A Comparative and Historical Analysis September 16, 2008 17 / 24 Table 3. Effect of communal history on the number of non-profit organizations The table shows OLS estimates of the effect of having been an independent city on the number of non-profit organizations per inhabitant in the city. Regressions are weighted using city population. Panel A is run on the sample of the 400 largest towns located in the Center-North of Italy (as of 1871). Panel B includes the whole sample of cities in the same area. Robust standard errors are reported in parentheses. *** significant at less than 1%; ** significant at 5%; * significant at 10%. Panel A: Sample of 400 largest towns in the Center-North Only History Commune History and geography History, geography and endowment No large towns No provincial capitals 0.42 (0.36) 1.12*** (0.33) 1.09 (0.81) 0.58* (0.33) 0.97*** (0.33) -0.15 (0.43) -0.77** (0.34) -4.11** (1.89) 1.98 (1.43) 1.05*** (0.33) 0.93 (0.79) 0.52* (0.30) 0.89*** (0.32) -0.16 (0.37) -0.67** (0.29) -5.35*** (1.80) 2.05 (1.39) 2.12** 0.93** (0.37) 0.66 (0.84) 0.93*** (0.27) 1.03*** (0.38) -0.35 (0.33) -0.31 (0.27) -33.26* (18.42) 351.79** (163.69) 0.38 1.72*** (0.39) 0.15 (0.65) 0.81*** (0.28) 0.25 (0.64) 0.01 (0.34) -0.01 (0.22) -49.26*** (12.46) 242.18*** (86.97) 0.11 (1.03) 14.63*** (4.91) (0.85) 12.98** (5.19) (0.80) 13.83*** (5.11) 400 0.30 381 0.30 337 0.26 Elevation Max difference in elevation Intersection of Roman roads On the coast More than 5km from coast Population (million people) Population squared Gini inequality index of Land ownership Gini income inequality index In...
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This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014 for the course ECON 2328 at Harvard.

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