180 why did the kuba push for increases in

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Unformatted text preview: h century the result was that boys married young, at less than twenty years of age rather than at twenty …ve or even, as among the Lele, thirty …ve, thus adding a sizable portion to the labor available for agriculture” (p. 180) “Why did the Kuba push for increases in productivity? .. The call for a surplus came from above, from the political authorities. It was imposed on the people.”(p. 184) Vansina argued that this was an outcome of the political centralization of the Kuba by Shyaam under the leadership of the Bushing – the political elite wanted taxes, tribute, wealth. James A. Robinson (Harvard) The Emergence of Modern Economic Growth: A Comparative and Historical Analysis September 23, 2009 19 / 21 Perspectives The example of the Lele and the Bushong along with Sahlins’ discussion link political innovation and political structure to the intensi…cation of production and the creation of a surplus. Quite possible that this is a model of the transition to farming and one that is quite di¤erent from the one inherent in Diamond. Recent archaeological research suggests that sedentism preceded farming and also there is a lot of evidence for social and ideological change prior to farming. Quite likely that these changes went alongside political change. Commonly argued that sedentism led to all sorts of changes, for instance the emergence of inequality and hierarchy. For one, there is evidence from Natu…an settlements of rich grave goods (dentalium shells) in some graves but not others, suggesting inequality possibly as a result of the control of trade. This is not to deny that the arrival of domestication increased agricultural productivity. Early village settlements based on cereal cultivation were 2 to 6 times larger than earlier pre-cultivation James A. Robinson (Harvard) The Emergence of Modern Economic Growth: A Comparative and Historical Analysis September 23, 2009 20 / 21 Dentalium Shells Perspectives Di¢ cult to deny the role of the ‘ Long Summer’and quite likely that the improved climate in conjunction with the many wild plant species created opportunities that did not exist previously or elsewhere. Yes many wild species which were potential domesticates are very widely distributes. Wild pigs and cattle, for instance, were spread all over Eurasia and North Africa. But this in itself only suggest that sedentism/farming could be attractive over a huge area, it does not predict why it happened at one place rather than another. Moreover, though early states like Nineveh or Uruk might have been in the fertile valleys of the Tigris and Euphrates, other early civilizations like the Phoenicians or even Greeks did not bene…t from very attractive agricultural conditions, rather they were based on trade (so maybe only needed to be in the vague vicinity of farmers). To explain the Neolithic Revolution one needs to understand institutional innovation. James A. Robinson (Harvard) The Emergence of Modern Economic Growth: A Comparative and Historical Analysis September 23, 2009 21 / 21...
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This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014 for the course ECON 2328 at Harvard.

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