Tm gc hillman and aj legge 2000 village of the

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Unformatted text preview: storical 8 / 21 The seminal work on Abu Hureyra Source: Moore, A.T.M., G.C. Hillman and A.J. Legge (2000) Village of the Euphrates: From Foraging to Farming in Abu Hureyra, Oxford University Press. p. 477. Source: Moore, A.T.M., G.C. Hillman and A.J. Legge (2000) Village of the Euphrates: From Foraging to Farming in Abu Hureyra, Oxford University Press. p. 478. Çatalhöyük Another important site is Çatalhöyük in Anatolia. Archaeological evidence suggests that this was sedentary town heavily dependent on hunting and gathering, though the inhabitants did engage in farming and some herding. What is interesting is that such a transitional place already shows a very complex society. The town shows a very rich religious and symbolic life. People were buried under houses, they embedded the skulls of bulls in their walls, made clay …gurines and wall paintings. Also evidence of shrines and cooperative activities though the society seems to have been based about the household and kin groups. Ian Hodder the Stanford archaeologist who has worked for years on the site argues that the transition to sedentism was a result of religious and ideological change (see last chapter of Barker for a discussion on this). James A. Robinson (Harvard) The Emergence of Modern Economic Growth: A Comparative and23, 2009 Analysis September Historical 9 / 21 The Çatalhöyük site Reconstructions of the town The Balance of Evidence As Bruce Smith in The Emergence of Agriculture (p. 79) describes the transition which took place in the Levant in the following way “their inhabitants had clearly shifted to permanent year-round settlements as early as 12,500 years ago and invested considerable labor in constructing houses and storage facilities. When people established sedentary settlements, their concepts of who owned resources likely became more restrictive as they strengthened their claim on the surrounding countryside, which they viewed more and more as being for their exclusive use. By 12,5000 BP, then, hunting and gathering societies began to adopt a way of life that set the logistic, econom...
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