The short parliament sat for only three weeks they

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Unformatted text preview: at for only three weeks, they refused to talk about taxes but aired many grievances until Charles dismissed them. The Scots realized that Charles did not have the support of the nation and invaded, occupying Newcastle. Charles opened negotiations and the Scots demanded that parliament be involved. This induced Charles to call what was to be the Long Parliament which continued to sit until 1649. In 1642 the Civil War broke out …nally leading to the defeat and execution of Charles in 1649. The monarchy was restored in 1660, but similar con‡icts emerged, particularly under James II, culminating in the Glorious Revolution of 1688. James was deposed by parliament and William of Orange brought over to be king. James A. Robinson (Harvard) The Emergence of Modern Economic Growth: A Comparative and30, 2009 Analysis: L September Historical 6 / 29 Institutional Changes The Glorious Revolution led to some key institutional changes. Parliaments met regularly for the …rst time. Parliament reasserted its prerogatives over taxation and introduced auditing of expenditures by the king. Abolition of prerogative courts, and by the Act of Settlement in 1701 judges became more independent (they could not be replaced by the king). Taken together these represent the triumph of parliament over the king. Indeed, parliament o¤ered the crown to William of Orange and subsequently in 1714 a Hanovarian who could not speak English (George I). James A. Robinson (Harvard) The Emergence of Modern Economic Growth: A Comparative and30, 2009 Analysis: L September Historical 7 / 29 Policy Changes The Glorious Revolution led to some key policy changes as well. The way to think about all of these is that the Whigs who triumphed in 1688 wanted explicitly to promote ‘ manufactures’and many of them were heavily invested in nascent industrial enterprises. It led to the abolition of the ‘ hearth tax’which had to be paid annually for each hearth and which economic historians have argued impeded manufacturing. It le...
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This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014 for the course ECON 2328 at Harvard.

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