2005 an economic history of south africa new york

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Unformatted text preview: : Feinstein, Charles H. (2005) An Economic History of South Africa, New York: Cambridge University Press. Source: Feinstein, Charles H. (2005) An Economic History of South Africa, New York: Cambridge University Press. So.. None of this proves or suggests that there are not feedbacks from capital accumulation to institutions, and maybe even other fundamental explanations, like culture. These examples do suggest however it may be more useful to think of education as an outcome of a certain structure of institutions. James A. Robinson (Harvard) The Emergence of Modern Economic Growth: A Comparative and2, 2009 September Historical Analysis 18 / 19 An Institutional Focus Most of the course will be following my book with Daron Acemoglu and proposing an institutional explanation for patterns of world economic growth and the Great Divergence. I shall start on Wednesday with a more intensive exploration of this approach and some evidence that supports it. I shall then move to explain why the other potential fundamental explanations are not the focus of the course. After this we move back to the beginning with an institutional interpretation of the Neolithic Revolution.... James A. Robinson (Harvard) The Emergence of Modern Economic Growth: A Comparative and2, 2009 September Historical Analysis 19 / 19...
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This document was uploaded on 02/28/2014 for the course ECON 2328 at Harvard.

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