Comparing the Application of Integrated Marketing Communication IMC in Magazine Ads Across Product T

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 19 pages.

Full Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found atJournal of AdvertisingISSN: 0091-3367 (Print) 1557-7805 (Online) Journal homepage: Comparing the Application of IntegratedMarketing Communication (IMC) in Magazine AdsAcross Product Type and TimeStephen J. Grove Ph.D. , Les Carlson Ph.D. & Michael J. Dorsch Ph.D.To cite this article:Stephen J. Grove Ph.D. , Les Carlson Ph.D. & Michael J. Dorsch Ph.D. (2007)Comparing the Application of Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) in Magazine Ads AcrossProduct Type and Time, Journal of Advertising, 36:1, 37-54, DOI: 10.2753/JOA0091-3367360103To link to this article:Published online: 04 Mar 2013.Submit your article to this journalArticle views: 347View related articlesCiting articles: 30 View citing articles
Journal of Advertising,vol. 36, no. 1 (Spring 2007), pp. 37–54.© 2007 American Academy of Advertising. All rights reserved.ISSN 0091-3367 / 2007 $9.50 + 0.00.DOI 10.2753/JOA0091-3367360103During the last decade of the twentieth century, the conceptof integrated marketing communications (IMC) receivedconsiderable attention from practitioners and academicsalike, and that interest has continued into the new millen-nium (e.g., Bearden and Madden 1996; Cornelissen and Lock2000; Duncan, Schultz, and Patti 2005; Garretson and Burton2005; Nowak and Phelps 1994; Schultz and Kitchen 2000a;Schumann, Artis, and Rivera 2001). As the marketplace hasbecome more fragmented over the years, organizations haveembraced IMC as a means to effectively and efficiently targetand attract the splintering mass market through the transmis-sion of a unified message across all “contact points” betweenorganizations and their consumers. Whether the contact pointis product packaging, a Web advertisement, or any other “in-formation bearing experience that a consumer or prospect haswith a brand” (Schultz, Tannenbaum, and Lauterborn 1993,p. 51), the goal is to present a message to an audience thatis consistent (Duncan 1993) and/or to generate valuable cus-tomer information (Roznowski, Reece, and Daugherty 2002;Yarborough 1996). In short, utilization and coordination ofvarious promotion and communication tools is necessary toassure optimal market coverage (Stewart 1996) and to developa strong marketing program (Nowak and Phelps 1994).Despite its potential contributions, debate still exists re-garding the significance of IMC as a practice (e.g., Cook 2004;Cornelissen and Lock 2000; Gould 2001). Questions pertain-ing to the prevalence of IMC in the marketplace (Roznowski,Reece, and Daugherty 2002) and regarding its differentialapplicability across product type (e.g., Nowak, Cameron,and Delorme 1996) remain. This study was designed to helpanswer these questions.INTEGRATED MARKETINGCOMMUNICATIONSIn recent years, the concept of IMC has made its way into themainstream of the marketing literature (Duncan and Cay-wood 1996; Nowak and Phelps 1994; Schultz 2003; Schultzand Kitchen 1997, 2000b; Zahay et al. 2004). This has oc-curred despite the fact that, in reality, there is no universallyagreed upon definition of IMC (e.g., Cornelissen and Lock

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 19 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Spring
Professor
chea

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture