Bouchard and Fragonard - From Rococo to Romanticism 1/25/12...

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From Rococo to Romanticism1/25/12Boucher and FragonardFragonard = climax of Rococo in France1.Gustaf Lundberg, Portrait of Francois Boucher, 1742Boucher = one of the most prominent and well-known artists of his time. Well-liked bymany monarchies. Career peaked in the 1740s – then he became the favored portraitist ofMadame de Pompadour (mistress of Louis 15)Did a lot of religious images (also commissioned by M. de Pompadour)1765 – named first painter of the King – one of the wealthiest and most celebrated artistsof his dayTarget for critics of Rococo… loved or despised him2.Boucher, Vulcan Presenting Venus with Arms for Aeneas, 1732His first ambitious paintingLargest, first major statement as an artistQuite influenced by WatteauMore striking than Watteau’s work… brushwork is very visible, bold, sharpness in theway that he delineates figuresClassical mythology: Venus needed to seduce her husbandNude and almost nude bodies, figures turned in every direction = maximum visualpleasureUse of classical mythology for the representation of erotic subjects and sensuality3.Boucher, Madame de Pompadour, 1756Madame de Pompadour: middle class origins (not aristocratic), considered to be verybeautiful, well-educated, mistress of King Louis XV, stayed in his court as a close advisorto him after their affair, very skillful at using visual imagery to craft an identity forherself – to heighten her status in court (circle of Louis XV), needed to reinvent herself inorder to fit into aristocratic societyThe portraits are not meant to be realism – not a lot of likeness to her (not the purpose),the purpose went beyond physical likeness to show her status… a lot of influence, bigpatroness of the arts, 5 year relationship with King, member of the bourgeoisie but tookon the manners, behaviors, appearances of the aristocracyPainting is a means of disseminating that “image” to the courtEvidence of her knowledge of literature, philosophy = texts and pamphlets scatteredaround the paintingVery luxurious surroundings = refined aesthetic tasteVarious engravings scattered that she made herself = showing off artistic talents… someengravings are made based on Boucher’s previous works = connects the two people andlinks them together as both artists… likens them. Flattering to M. de Pompadour becauseshe is represented in dialogue with one of the greatest artists of her day
4.Boucher, Madame de Pompadour at her Toilette, 1758Covered in ribbons, powders, makeup, box of rouge and small brush that she applies toher cheeks… pink and white shades, little touches of blueVery feminine, delicate palette = emphasizing finery and luxurious dressBracelet: directly under her face, the face of King Louis XV = double portrait, this imageasserts/affirms their relationship and the connection between them which also asserts herauthority as mistress

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Term
Spring
Professor
MichelleFoa
Tags
History of painting, King Louis XV, Francois Boucher, Louis XV, Madame de Pompadour

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