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Lab 6: Web Page Creation

Lab 6: Web Page Creation - ECS 15 Lab 6 Web Page Creation...

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ECS 15 Lab 6: Web Page Creation This is an adaptation of an assignment written by Professor Xin Liu. In this lab you’ll be creating a web page. In a web page, the content of the web page, or what you see, is mixed in with the formatting, which you don’t see, but controls things like paragraph breaks, pictures, links, and so on. 1. Tags In HTML, every formatting element is known as a tag . A tag is a word enclosed between the < and > symbols, like the following tag for a new paragraph: <p> A tag usually means that whatever follows the tag has whatever the tag means applied to it, until the ending tag appears. An ending tag is just like the tag it matches, but begins with a </ rather than just a < . For example, a title looks like <title> This is the title of this document. </title> Everything between the <title> and the </title> is, in fact, the title. There are a few exceptions, that is, tags that do not need an ending tag. <p> is one of them, the related <br> (paragraph break) is another. Note that there can’t be spaces between the < and the tag name, or between the < and the / in an ending tag, so the following aren’t valid tags: < title> </ title> < /title> But the tag names are case insensitive, so <TITLE> is valid, as is <TiTLe> . 1.1. Tags in every document Every html document begins with a <html> tag, and ends with a </html> tag. What goes between these is the actual web page. Anything that appears outside of them will not show up if you open it in a browser. Documents usually have two main sections: a heading and a body. The heading defines the title, and may also refer to a stylesheet for the document (more on that later.) It is enclosed in a <head> </head> tag pair. The body contains what you really see on the web page, and it is enclosed in a <body> </body> tag pair. 1.2. Other useful tags Two really useful tags are the tags for hyperlinks, the a tag (for anchor ), and the tag for an image, img . Here they are: Here’s an example of an anchor tag: <a href=”http://www.cs.ucdavis.edu/~liu/ECS15/15.html”>Course home page</a> Notice the name of the tag is a , but it has another thing after it, the href=“class URL” bit.
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