Representation Reading ECI 314 Early Childhoodhood Mathematics

In solving a problem such as the one in one gorilla

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Type-4 representation in Sinclair et al. (1983). One-to-one correspondence can be seen in “3 4 5” and “12345.” The child who wrote “5322” represented “five” and “three” with Type5 notation, and “two” with Type-4 notation (22). When adults write equations such as “3 + 2 = 5,” we represent each origi­ nal whole twice—once in the “3” and again in the “5” as part of the higherorder whole, and once in the “2” and again in the “5” as part of the higher-order whole. Children who cannot make this kind of part-whole relationship often leave out the “5” and/or the “=” sign. Their ways of writing thus help us understand why so many first graders read “4 + 2 = 6” as “4 2 6” or “4 + 2 6.” “Equations” such as “5 + 5 = 10 + 5 = 15” Many teachers vehemently object to nonconventional “equations” such as “5 + 5 = 10 + 5 = 15 + 5 = 20 + 5 = 25” (which are incorrect because the two sides of all the “=” signs are unequal). Our first graders often write this kind of equation, but...
View Full Document

This document was uploaded on 03/13/2014.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online