2 printed copies of the bill in its final form

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Unformatted text preview: ons, integrity and probity required of all public servants. 2. Congressional investigation—involves a more intense digging of facts. It is recognized under Section 21, Article VI. Even in the absence of constitutional mandate, it has been held to be an essential and appropriate auxiliary to the legislative functions. 3. Legislative supervision—it connotes a continuing and informed awareness on the part of congressional committee regarding executive operations in a given administrative area. It allows Congress to scrutinize the exercise of delegated law‐making authority, and permits Congress to retain part of that delegated authority. Q: What is legislative veto? Is it allowed in the Philippines? A: Legislative veto is a statutory provision requiring the President or an administrative agency to present the proposed IRR of a law to Congress which, by itself or through a committee formed by it, retains a “right” or “power” to approve or disapprove such regulations before they take effect. As such, a legislative veto in the form of a congressional oversight committee is in the form of an inward‐turning delegation designed to attach a congressional leash to an agency to which Congress has by law initially delegated broad powers. It radically changes the design or structure of the Constitution’s diagram of power as it entrusts to Congress a direct role in 36 enforcing, applying or implementing its own laws. Thus, legislative veto is not allowed in the Philippines. (ABAKADA Guro Party‐list v. Purisima, G.R. No. 166715, Aug. 14, 2008) Q: Can Congress exercise discretion to approve or disapprove an IRR based on a determination of whether or not it conformed to the law? A: No. In exercising discretion to approve or disapprove the IRR based on a determination of whether or not it conformed to the law, Congress arrogated judicial power unto itself, a power exclusively vested in the Supreme Court by the Constitution. Hence, it violates the doctrine of separation of powers. (ABAKADA Guro Party‐list v. Purisima, G.R. No. 166715, Aug. 14, 2008) Q: May the...
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