96986FrederickDouglas1614064030_1614098063.pdf - In his...

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In his speech “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July,” Frederick Douglass uses harsh, direct diction and repetition to unveil the constant atrocities faced by black slaves at the time and the injustice of the system of slavery. The list of obscenities that slaves were facing that Douglas lists seems almost never-ending, which supports Douglas’s point that the amount of cruelty slaves faced was never-ending. The repetition gruesomely emphasizes that white slave owners did not treat their black slaves as humans and uncovers how unjust slavery was. Merciless and bitter language such as “rob,” “flay,” and “starve” insinuate that black people were being grossly mistreated. Douglas condemns America for being untrue to its founding principles of freedom by

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