Teens-and-Mobile-Phones (1)

More than a quarter of texting teens say they check

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Unformatted text preview: sed as a part of school work done outside of school. In the Pew Internet Project survey, the most frequently given reason why teens send and receive text messages is to "just say hello and chat." More than nine in ten teens (96%) say that they at least occasionally text just to say hello, and more than half (51%) say they do this several times a day. A younger high school boy in our focus groups describes his text messaging: "I think it ’s basically just chatting. It ’s small talk. How are you doing? What ’s up?" The vast majority of teens also say they use text messaging to report where they are or to check in on where someone else is, with 89% of text -using teens reporting this. More than a quarter of texting teens say they check in several times Pew Internet & American Life Project a day and another quarter do it at least once a day. Teens and Mobile Phones | 56 you doing? What ’s up?" The vast majority of teens also say they use text messaging to report where they are or to check in on where someone else is, with 89% of text -using teens reporting this. More than a quarter of texting teens say they check in several times a day and another quarter do it at least once a day. Three -quarters of texting teens use text messaging to exchange information privately – with more than a quarter doing this daily or several times a day. Another three -quarters of text -using teens also say they have lon...
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This document was uploaded on 03/12/2014 for the course INFORMATIO 101 at Rutgers.

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