lesson_10.1.2_version_1.6_student

Sampling from a normal population for the last

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: STATWAY™ STUDENT HANDOUT | 5 Lesson 10.1.2 Central Limit Theorem for Sample Means 15 What is the shape of the sampling distribution? 16 Sketch the sampling distribution, when n = 2, in the box below. Run the simulation for sample sizes n = 10, and n = 30. Sketch your results in the boxes below. For each simulation, set N = 1000 so 1000 random samples are created. The Wild Population n =2 n =10 n = 30 17 What happens to the center and variability of the sampling distribution when the sample size increases to n = 30? 18 Identify the mean and standard deviation (or error) of the sampling distribution when n = 30. How do they compare to the mean and standard deviation of the population? Sampling from a Normal Population For the last example, we sample from a normal population.  Set the Population type to Bell shaped, and then click the Reset button.  Set the sample size, n, to 2 and set the number of samples, N, to 1000.  Click Sample © 2011 THE CARNEGIE FOUNDATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF TEACHING A PATHWAY THROUGH STATISTICS, VERSION 1.6, STATWAY™  ­ STUDENET HANDOUT STATWAY™ STUDENT HANDOUT | 6 Lesson 10.1.2 Central Limit Theorem for Sample Means 19 Does the distribution of sample means appear normal? 20 Experiment with different values of n, up to 100, clicking Sample for each. Are you able to construct any distribution of sample means that does not appear normal for any sample size? 21 When sampling from a normal population, is any restriction upon sample size necessary in order for the distribution of sample means to be normal? © 2011 THE CARNEGIE FOUNDATION FOR THE...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online