A maintenance electrician supervisor or instructor

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Unformatted text preview: ing for help, you will protect yourself and others. Summary of Section 6 Look for "clues" that hazards are present. Evaluate the seriousness of hazards. Decide if you need to take action. Don't ignore signs of trouble. n 18-year-old male worker, with 15 months of experience at a fast food restaurant, was plugging a toaster into a floor outlet when he received a shock. Since the restaurant was closed for the night, the floor had been mopped about 10 minutes before the incident. The restaurant manager and another employee heard the victim scream and investigated. The victim was found with one hand on the plug and the other hand grasping the metal receptacle box. His face was pressed against the top of the outlet. An employee tried to take the victim's pulse but was shocked. The manager could not locate the correct breaker for the circuit. He then called the emergency squad, returned to the breaker box, and found the correct breaker. By the time the circuit was opened (turned off), the victim had been exposed to the current for 3 to 8 minutes. The employee checked the victim's pulse again and found that it was very rapid. A The manager and the employee left the victim to unlock the front door and place another call for help. Another employee arrived at the restaurant and found that the victim no longer had a pulse. The employee began administering CPR, which was continued by the rescue squad for 90 minutes. The victim was dead on arrival at a local hospital. Later, two electricians evaluated the circuit and found no serious problems. An investigation showed that the victim's hand slipped forward when he was plugging in the toaster. His index finger made contact with an energized prong in the plug. His other hand was on the metal receptacle box, which was grounded. Current entered his body through his index finger, flowed across his chest, and exited through the other hand, which was in contact with the grounded receptacle. To prevent death or injury, you must recognize hazards and take the right action. If the circuit had been equipped with a GFCI, the current would have been shut off before injury occurred. The recent mopping increased the risk of electrocution. Never work in wet or damp areas! Know the location of circuit breakers for your work area. Section 6 Page 37 S AF ET Y M O D EL S TAG E 3--C O N T rOLLING HAZArDS: SAFE WOrK ENVIrON M EN T Section 7 Safety Model Stage 3-- Controlling Hazards: Safe Work Environment How Do You Control Hazards? In order to control hazards, you must first create a safe work environment, then work in a safe manner. Generally, it is best to remove the hazards altogether and create an environment that is truly safe. When OSHA regulations and the NFPA 70E are followed, safe work environments are created. But, you never know when materials or equipment might fail. Prepare yourself for the unexpected by using safe work practices. Use as many safeguards as possible. If one fails, another may protect you from injury or death. How Do You Create a Safe Work Environment? Guard against contact with electrical voltages and control electrical currents to create a safe work environment. A safe work environment is created by controlling contact with electrical voltages and the currents they can cause. Electrical currents need to be controlled so they do not pass through the body. In addition to preventing shocks, a safe work environment reduces the chance of fires, burns, and falls. You need to guard against contact with electrical voltages and control electrical currents in order to create a safe work environment. Make your environment safer by doing the following: Treat all conductors--even "de-energized" ones--as if they are energized until they are locked out and tagged. Verify circuits are de-energized before starting work. Lock out and tag out circuits and machines. Prevent overloaded wiring by using the right size and type of wire. Prevent exposure to live electrical parts by isolating them. Prevent exposure to live wires and parts by using insulation. Prevent shocking currents from electrical systems and tools by grounding them. Prevent shocking currents by using GFCIs. Prevent too much current in circuits by using overcurrent protection devices. Page 38 Section 7 A t about 1:45 a.m., two journeyman electricians began replacing bulbs and making repairs on light fixtures in a spray paint booth at an automobile assembly plant. The job required the two electricians to climb on top of the booth and work from above. The top of the booth was filled with pipes and ducts that restricted visibility and movement. Flashlights were required. The electricians started at opposite ends of the booth. One electrician saw a flash of light, but continued to work for about 5 minutes, then climbed down for some wire. While cutting the wire, he smelled a burning odor and called to the other electrician. When no one answered, he climbed back on top of the booth. He found his co-worker in contact with a single-strand wire from...
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