Safety Manual (1) - DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

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This document is in the public domain and may be freely copied or reprinted. DISCLAIMER Mention of any company or product does not constitute endorsement by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). In addition, citations to Web sites external to NIOSH do not constitute NIOSH endorsement of the sponsoring organizations or their pro- grams or products. Furthermore, NIOSH is not responsible for the content of these Web sites. All Web addresses referenced in this document were accessible as of the publication date. ORDERING INFORMATION This document is in the public domain and may be freely copied or reprinted. To receive NIOSH documents or more information about occupational safety and health topics, contact NIOSH at 1–800–CDC–INFO (1–800–232–4636) TTY: 1–888–232–6348 E-mail: [email protected] or visit the NIOSH Web site at www.cdc.gov/niosh For a monthly update on news at NIOSH, subscribe to NIOSH eNews by visiting www.cdc.gov/niosh/eNews . DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 2009–113 (supersedes 2002–123) April 2009 Safer • Healthier • People™
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Foreword The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) esti- mates that 230,000 young workers under the age of 18 suffer work-related injuries in the United States each year. Young and new workers have a high risk for work-related injury compared with more experienced workers. Occupational safety and health training remains a fundamental element of hazard control in the workplace, and there is great potential to reduce these incidents through pre-employment training. Effective pre-employment training should include realistic environments and hands-on exercises. However, NIOSH recommends that actual employment in the electrical trades or any of the other construction trades be delayed until individuals reach the minimum age of 18. This student manual is part of a safety and health curriculum for secondary and post-secondary electrical trades courses. The manual is designed to engage the learner in recognizing, evaluating, and controlling hazards associ- ated with electrical work. It was developed through extensive research with vocational instructors, and we are grateful for their valuable contributions. Christine M. Branche, Ph.D. Acting Director National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Centers for Disease Control and Prevention iii
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Acknowledgments This document was prepared by Thaddeus W. Fowler, Ed.D. and Karen K. Miles, Ph.D., Education and Information Division (EID) of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Editorial services were provided by John W. Diether and Rodger L. Tatken. Pauline Elliott, Gino Fazio, and Vanessa Becks provided layout and design services. The authors wish to thank John Palassis and Diana Flaherty (NIOSH), Robert Nester (formerly of NIOSH), and participating teachers and stu- dents for their contributions to the development of this document.
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Safety Manual (1) - DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

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