Shut off the electrical current if the victim is

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Unformatted text preview: he energized circuit. While you do this, have someone else call for help. If you cannot get to the switchgear quickly, pry the victim from the circuit with something that does not conduct electricity such as dry wood. Do not touch the victim yourself if he or she is still in contact with an electrical circuit! You do not want to be a victim, too! Do not leave the victim unless there is absolutely no other option. You should stay with the victim while emergency medical services (EMS) are contacted. The caller should come back to you afterwards to verify that the call was made. If the victim is not breathing, does not have a heartbeat, or is badly injured, quick response by a team of emergency medical technicians (EMTs) or paramedics gives the best chance for survival. Learn first aid Page 16 Once you know that electrical current is no longer flowing through the victim, call out to the victim to see if he or she is conscious (awake). If the victim is conscious, tell the victim not to move. It is possible for a shock victim to be seriously injured but not realize it. Quickly examine the victim for signs of major bleeding. If there is a lot of bleeding, place a cloth (such as a handkerchief or bandanna) over the wound and apply pressure. If the wound is in an arm or leg and keeps bleeding a lot, gently elevate the injured area while keeping pressure on the wound. Keep the victim warm and talk to him or her until help arrives. If the victim is unconscious, check for signs of breathing. While you do this, move the victim as little as possible. If the victim is not breathing, someone trained in CPR should begin artificial breathing, then check to see if the victim has a pulse. Quick action is essential! To be effective, CPR must be performed within 4 minutes of the shock. If you are not trained in CPR or first aid, now is the time to get trained--before you find yourself in this situation! Ask your instructor or supervisor how you can become certified in CPR. You also need to know the location of (1) electricity shut-offs ("kill switches"), (2) first-aid supplies, and (3) a telephone so you can find them quickly in an emergency. and CPr now! Page 17 OV E r V I E W O F T H E S A F E T Y M O D E L Section 4: Overview of the Safety Model What Must Be Done to Be Safe? Use the safety model to recognize, evaluate, and control hazards. Use the three-stage safety model: recognize, evaluate, and control hazards. To be safe, you must think about your job and plan for hazards. To avoid injury or death, you must understand and recognize hazards. You need to evaluate the situation you are in and assess your risks. You need to control hazards by creating a safe work environment, by using safe work practices, and by reporting hazards to a supervisor or teacher. If you do not recognize, evaluate, and control hazards, you may be injured or killed by the electricity itself, electrical fires, or falls. If you use the report hazards to your supervisor safety model to recognize, or teacher. evaluate, and control hazards, you are much safer. Identify electrical hazards. (1) recognize hazards The first part of the safety model is recognizing the hazards around you. Only then can you avoid or control the hazards. It is best to discuss and plan hazard recognition tasks with your co-workers. Sometimes we take risks ourselves, but when we are responsible for others, we are more careful. Sometimes others see hazards that we overlook. Of course, it is possible to be talked out of our concerns by someone who is reckless or dangerous. Don't take a chance. Careful planning of safety procedures reduces the risk of injury. Decisions to lock out and tag out circuits and equipment need to be made during this part of the safety model. Plans for action must be made now. Don't listen to reckless, dangerous people. Page 18 Section 4 OSHA regulations, the NEC, NFPA 70E Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, and the National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) provide a wide range of safety information. Although these sources may be difficult to read and understand at first, with practice they can become very useful tools to help you recognize unsafe conditions and practices. Knowledge of OSHA standards is an important part of training for electrical apprentices. See the Appendix for a list of relevant standards. Always lock out and tag out circuits. (2) Evaluate hazards When evaluating hazards, it is best to identify all possible hazards first, then evaluate the risk of injury from each hazard. Do not assume the risk is low until you evaluate the hazard. It is dangerous to overlook hazards. Job sites are especially dangerous because they are always changing. Many people are working at different tasks. Job sites are frequently exposed to bad weather. A reasonable place to work on a bright, sunny day might be very hazardous in the rain. The risks in your work environment need to be evaluated all the time. Then, whatever hazards are present need to be controlled. Evaluate your risk. (3)...
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This document was uploaded on 03/14/2014 for the course ECE 482 at University of Tennessee.

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