1 show that the operator is stable well omit their

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Unformatted text preview: the mesh spacing, we can construct higher-order approximations by Richardson's extrapolation. Thus, we calculate two solutions y , i = 0 1 : : : N , and y 22, i = 0 1 : : : 2N , with spacing h and h =2, i = 0 1 : : : N , respectively. Using (8.3.5a) we have X y(x ) ; y = d (x )h2 + O(h2 +2) i = 0 1 ::: N h i i K h i k i k =1 k i K i 11 h= i i= y(x ) ; y 2 = h= i X d (x )( h )2 + O(h2 2 K i k i k =1 k K i +2) i = 0 1 : : : N: Subtracting the two results, we obtain an approximation of the error as d1(x )h2 = 4 (y 2 ; y ) + O(h2) 3 h= i (8.3.7a) h i i i The approximation can be added to, e.g., y 2, i = 0 1 : : : N , to obtain the higher-order solution h= i 2 ^ y 2 = y 2 + y 3; y + O(h4): h= h= i h i h= i (8.3.7b) i This process can be repeated to eliminate successively higher-order terms is the error expansion (8.3.5a). Instead of doing this, however, we'll describe the alternate approach of deferred corrections. Consider a solution y , i = 0 1 : : : N , of (8.2.3). Using (8.3.1), we know that this solution satis es i i (y(x )) = (y): i (8.3.8a) i Suppose that ^ (y)) is an O(h ) approximation of , then the solution of p i i i (^ ) = ^ (y) y i i g (^0) = g (^ ) = 0 y y i = 1 2 ::: N ; 1 L R N (8.3.8b) is an O(h ) approximation of y(x). This process can be repeated, as shown in Figure 8.3.2, with successively better approximations of the local discretization error. Some comments about the procedure follow. p 1. Unlike Richardson's extrapolation, the same mesh is used for the entire sequence of computations. 2. ^ is an O(h2 +2) approximation of the local discretization error hence, it is an O(h2 +2) approximation of the rst K terms in (8.3.2a). K K i K 3. Likewise, y( ), i = 0 1 : : : N , is an O(h2 +2) approximation of y(x). K K i 4. ^ ( +1) (y( )) is an a posteriori estimate of the local discretization error of the solution y( ), i = 0 1 : : : N . K K i K i 12 procedure deferred correction begin ^ (0) (y( 1) ) = 0 i = 1 2 ::: N ; K := 0 while accuracy not su cient do i begin Solve (y( )) = ^ ( )(y( 1)) ( g (y0 )) = g (y( )) = 0 Calculate ^ +1(y( )) K := K + 1 K i K i i = 1 2 : : : N ; 1, K; i K K L R K N K i end end f deferred correction g Figure 8.3.2: Algorithm for deferred corrections. 5. Lentini and Pereyra 7] implemented this procedure in a nite-di erence code called PASVA for the solution of two-point boundary value problems. It remains to compute the approximation ^ ( )(y( 1)), i = 0 1 : : : N . This can be done by passing a (2K + 1) th-degree polynomial through the 2K points neighboring x and interpolating (x f (x y( 1))) at these points. We obtain an approximation ^ T (y( 1)) of T (y(x 1 2 )) by di erentiating the interpolating polynomial. The result is X ^ ^ ( )(y( 1)) = h2 T( )(y( 1)(x 1 2 )): K K; i K; i K j K; k k j j i; = K K K; K k i k =1 i K; i; = k The interpolation formulas can be complex and, typically, a mixture of centered, forward, and backward di erence approximations are used. Example 8.3.2. When K = 1 we require ^ (1) (y(0) ) to be an O(h4 ) accurate approximation of . This can be done with a cubic polynomial approximation of i i T1 (y(x 1 (x 1 2 y(x 1 2 )): 1 2 )) = ; 12 f i; = 00 i; = i; = Let the cubic polynomial...
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This document was uploaded on 03/16/2014 for the course CSCI 6820 at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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