Setting and Archetype Notes - Fabian Pekins Liz Setting and Archetypes in Crime and Punishment Settings 1 St Petersburg Dostoyevskys home High class

Setting and Archetype Notes - Fabian Pekins Liz Setting and...

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Fabian, Pekins, Liz Setting and Archetypes in Crime and Punishment Settings: 1. St. Petersburg Dostoyevsky’s home High class city Low class characters 2. America Represents new start / also ending Svidrigaïlov’s escape Not literal 3. Siberia Cold and isolated Redemption Desert (barren land used ironically for hope) Freedom in imprisonment Archetypes: Moon: -“The twilight had fallen and full moon was shining more and more brightly; but there was a peculiar breathlessness in the air.” -“…the moon showed through the panes with a melancholy and mysterious light…” -“‘It’s the moon that makes it so still, weaving some mystery’” -“…the more silent the moonlight, the more violently his heart beat.” -In literature, the moon is associated with darkness. Characters turn into monsters or werewolves (evil figures), bringing out the evil in them and revealing the dark side to the character. -The moon is mentioned multiple times while Rodya is asleep and dreaming. He was dreaming of killing the old woman, just as he did before, except this time she would not die. In this passage the descriptions of the moon are repeated to put emphasis on how his evil actions caused him to be anxious, sluggish, and afraid. Part 3, Chapter 6, paragraph 61. Madness: common archetype theme. Part 3, Chapter 6, paragraph 61. Dream The dream Rodya had is a result of him going mad. Dreams are a person’s subconscious showing them their worries or events going on in their lives in a symbolic form. In literature, dreams are often the key to the deeper thoughts of the character, which helps to get to know them better. Rodya’s dream was of his worries of what he had done, and it exposes the reader to why he acted the way he did after he committed the crime. -“Why, who can tell? Perhaps I am really mad, and perhaps everything that happened all these days may be only imagination.” He openly admits to being mad and going crazy. Part 4, Chapter 2, paragraph 293. Blood: color red archetype, death. -“But a sort of blankness, even dreaminess, had begun by degrees to take possession of him; at moments he forgot himself, or rather forgot what was of importance and caught at trifles.
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Glancing, however, into the kitchen and seeing a bucket half full of water on the bench, he bethought him of washing his hands and the axe. His hands were sticky with blood.” Intertextuality, and his suffering in blood represents the suffering of Christ. Blood can represent death, guilt, and pain. Part 1, Chapter 7, paragraph 29. -“‘But you are spattered with blood,’ observed Nikodim Fomitch, noticing in the lamplight some fresh stains on Raskolnikov’s waistcoat. ‘Yes . . . I’m covered with blood,’ Raskolnikov said with a peculiar air; then he smiled, nodded, and went downstairs.” Part 2, Chapter 7, paragraphs 90-91.
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