Lecture 4 Notes

We perform this expansion by examining the type if the

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Unformatted text preview: ¥¡ £ © © £¤ §§ © £ ¡¡ % £ ¢  ¡ £ £ £ © § £ ¦ ¥ ¦ § £ § £ §  6 ¡ £ £ ¥ © © £ ¡£ £ £ §§§£¦ ¢ £ ¡¡ © £ ¥ ¦ ©£ %1 ¡ £¦ ¥¦ ©£ © £ § © £ § £ ©  ¥ &¡  ¤¢  £¡ £ ©  ¡ £ ©£ § £    ¡ % £ " © ¡ © ¡ £  § § ¨¡ §£¦ ¥ ¦ ¡ ¥ © £ ¢¢ ¡¡£ § £ ¡%©£ ¥ ¥ ££ ¢ £ £ ¢ ¡ % £ " © ¡ % £ " © £ ¡ 7.4 Modules that declare types So far, our interfaces have declared only ordinary variables and their types. In the next module language, we allow interfaces to declare types as well. For example, the interface £ § § ¡¡ ¢ $ § ¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¦¡  ¢¦© £ ¡  %  ¥ ¦ ¡ ¡   £ £ £ " ¡ ¡  ¦© ¢ ¡ £ " £¡% ¢¡ £ "  ¥ ¦  £ " ¡ ¦¡  £ &1£ ¦   ¡ % £ © ¢ £ ¢£ ¢£ ¢ £ declares a type , and some operations , , , that operate on values of that type. This is the interface that might be associated with an implementation of arithmetic. We will introduce two kinds of type declarations: type abbreviations and abstract types. Both are necessar...
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This document was uploaded on 03/17/2014 for the course CSG 111 at Northeastern.

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