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Synfuels
Plant‐Key
Figures
 
 Coal
type
 Lignite
coal
 In
operation
since
 1984
 Annual
coal
consumption
(million
tons)
 6
 Annual
SNG
production
(billion
standard
cubic
 feet)
 54
 CO2
emissions
from
the
SNG
plant
(tons/day)
 6,080
 Annual
plant
capacity
factor
(%)
 90–92
 
 2.4.
Recent
Developments
in
SNG
 2.4.1.
Research
and
development
in
SNG
 Recently,
the
energy
industry
has
shown
considerable
interest
in
the
coal‐to‐SNG
concept.
General
 Electric
Energy
is
working
with
the
University
of
Wyoming
to
build
a
$100
million
advanced
coal
 gasification
research
and
technology
center
in
Wyoming
which
will
focus
on
the
different
aspects
of
 converting
Powder
River
Basin
(PRB)
coal
to
SNG.
The
proposed
research
center
would
build
a
scaled‐ down
commercial
power
plant,
which
could
be
operational
by
2010
(Farquhar
2008).
The
Arizona
Public
 Service
Company
(APS)
along
with
the
Department
of
Energy
and
other
partners
are
developing
a
 hydrogasification
process
to
co‐produce
SNG
and
electricity
from
western
coals.
The
objective
of
the
 $12.9
million
project
is
to
develop
and
demonstrate
an
engineering‐scale
hydrogasification
process
 which
can
produce
SNG
at
a
cost
of
less
than
$5/MMBtu
and
can
utilize
low‐ranked
western
coal
(NETL
 2008).
The
Western
Research
Institute
(WRI)
is
working
on
the
development
of
a
gasification
process
 which
uses
counter‐current
cyclonic
methods
in
a
unique
sequence
that
causes
activated
carbon
char
to
 react
with
synthesis
gas,
both
derived
from
coal.
The
method
does
not
require
pure
oxygen
to
produce
 the
synthesis
gas
(WRI
2008).
 
 The
catalytic
steam
gasification
process
developed
by
Great
Point
Energy
Inc.
is
considered
to
be
a
great
 advancement
in
SNG
technology.
The
process
involves
a
single
reactor
using
a
proprietary,
recyclable
 catalyst
developed
in‐house
and
made
from
abundant
low‐cost
metals.
The
catalyst
was
developed
with
 Climate
Change
Policy
Partnership
 8
 Synthetic
Natural
Gas
(SNG):
Technology,
Environmental
Implications,
and
Economics
 the
help
of
Southern
Illinois
University,
the
University
of
Toronto,
and
the
University
of
Tennessee
 (Fairley
2007).
The
heat
released
in
the
syngas‐to‐methane
step
is
sufficient
to
sustain
the
gasification,
 eliminating
the
need
to
fire
up
the
reactions
with
purified
oxygen.
The
process
was
demonstrated
with
a
 week...
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This essay was uploaded on 03/18/2014 for the course ENG 316K taught by Professor Kruppa during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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