Thebiomasscanalsobeusedalongwithcoaltoproducesngtheuse

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Unformatted text preview: ces:
it
contains
25%
of
the
 world’s
coal
reserves,
and
the
energy
content
of
those
reserves
exceeds
the
energy
content
of
the
 world’s
known
recoverable
oil
(DOE
2008).
Still,
increasing
consumption—and
the
resultant
increasing
 price—of
natural
gas
are
a
concern.
According
to
DOE
(2008),
90%
of
new
U.S.
power
plants
will
be
 natural
gas–fired
plants.
The
ever
increasing
demand
and
high
price
of
natural
gas
in
recent
past
has
led
 researchers
to
consider
alternate
methods
of
natural
gas
generation.
Converting
coal
to
natural
gas
 could
satisfy
the
demand
for
natural
gas
while
utilizing
the
United
States’
abundant
coal
resources.
 “Synthetic
natural
gas”
or
“substitute
natural
gas”
(SNG)
is
an
artificially
produced
version
of
natural
gas.
 SNG
can
be
produced
from
coal,
biomass,
petroleum
coke,
or
solid
waste.
The
carbon‐containing
mass
 can
be
gasified;
the
resulting
syngas
can
then
be
converted
to
methane,
the
major
component
of
natural
 gas.
 
 There
are
several
advantages
associated
with
producing
SNG
from
coal.
SNG
could
be
a
major
driver
for
 energy
security.
SNG
production
could
diversify
energy
options
and
reduce
natural
gas
imports,
thus
 helping
to
stabilize
fuel
prices.
SNG
can
be
transported
and
distributed
using
existing
natural
gas
 infrastructure
and
utilized
in
existing
natural
gas–fired
power
plants.
And
as
coal
is
abundant
and
evenly
 distributed
globally
as
compared
to
oil
and
natural
gas,
SNG
could
stabilize
the
global
energy
market.

 
 The
biomass
can
also
be
used
along
with
coal
to
produce
SNG.
The
use
of
biomass
would
reduce
the
 greenhouse
gas
emissions,
as
biomass
is
a
carbon‐neutral
fuel.
In
addition,
the
development
of
SNG
 technology
would
also
boost
the
other
gasification‐based
technologies
such
as
hydrogen
generation,
 integrated
gasification
combined
cycle
(IGCC),
or
coal‐to‐liquid
technologies
as
SNG
share
at
least
the
 gasification
process
with
these
processes.
 Climate
Change
Policy
Partnership
 3
 Synthetic
Natural
Gas
(SNG):
Technology,
Environmental
Implications,
and
Economics
 
 There
are
many
different
issues
associated
with
the
deployment
of
SNG.
Interest
in
developing
SNG
 dates
back
to
the
1970s,
when
the
energy
crisis
led
researchers
and
policymakers
to
consider
ways
to
 convert
coal
into
gaseous
and
liquid
fuels.
However,
the
later
stabilization
of
the
fuel
market
and
 increased
availability
of
low‐cost
fuels
led
to
the
abandonment
of
most
of
coal‐to‐SNG
projects.
Another
 pr...
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This essay was uploaded on 03/18/2014 for the course ENG 316K taught by Professor Kruppa during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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