One-Dimensional Collisions

This is given by 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 19 41 elastic

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Unformatted text preview: se in internal energy. This is given by ∆ 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 (19) 4.1 Elastic Collisions The first collision that we will deal with is the elastic collision. In this collision, kinetic energy and momentum are conserved. This means that ∆ 0 1 2 1 2 1 2 (20) (21) 1 2 (22) However, due to the fact that this experiment will not be a complete elastic collision, after all complete elastic collisions only happen in theory, ΔQ will not be zero. Thus we must find the difference in the kinetic energies. To do this we use equation (19). This value will give you the total internal energy of the system. Then once you have done this you can find the ratio of the change in the internal energy to the initial kinetic energy. This is done by using 1 2 ∆ 1 2 1 2 ∆ ∆ 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 (23) (24) 0 (25) As we can see, if the final kinetic energy is equal to the initial kinetic energy then the ratio is zero like we expect it to be. 6 The next set of calculations will involve finding final and initial momentums which can be found by using (26) (27) where pf is the final momentum and pi is the initial momentum...
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This document was uploaded on 03/20/2014 for the course PHYS 215 at Lafayette.

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