SYLLABUS - RECEWED JAN't tint introduction to American...

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Unformatted text preview: RECEWED JAN't tint introduction to American Government Does Government Work? PLSC 220.02 (20980) rrn10:30 AMI—11:45AM WSTN 304 . Dr. Ernest McGowen, HI emcgovvenf’CDrichmondedu 804-484—1627 VVeinstein Hall 2021 Office Hours: T 9:30a — 10:30a, TH 9:30a 7103021 or by appointment Course Description This course is an introduction to United States national government. The course includes a framework for understanding United States government and politics and the constitutional basis for the processes, the institutions, and the policies of United States government and politics. ' Special emphasis will be paid to our roles as citizens in shaping our republican democracy. Additionally, the course will utilize news stories and internet resources to facilitate discussion and relate contemporary politics with canonical political science theories. To be successful in this course, you should expect to devote an average of 10—14 hours each week to preparing for class, participating in class sessions: studying course related materials, and completing course assignments. Textbook Greenberg, Edward, Benjamin Page. The Strucgle for Democm . Eleventh Edition. Pearson Longman, 2012. ISBN: 0205909049 Website F or class information and assignments please see the Blackboard site at blackboardrichmondedu. MyPoliSciLab assignments will be completed via pearsonmylabandmastering.com. Class notes WELL NOT be on Blackboard. Class notes are available, but you must come to office hours to review/copy them. Course Objectives The primary goal for the course is to increase your knowledge of American Government. Secondarily, you will become more informed citizens able to consume news and political media with a better understanding of the details. This will enable you to use critical thinking about your attitudes and opinions to better express yourself in political discussions. Lastly, you will be able to view the actions of your government based on systematic criteria or purposive outcomes instead of subjective and popular norms of ideology or partisanship. The course can be roughly be broken down into three parts. The first part will focus on the origins of our democracy and political culture, which are the foundations of the politics we see on a daily basis. The second part will deal with the modern tools of our government, including the psychological and statistical rationales behind opinion polling and political participation, Specifically voter tumout. The final part will deal with the branches of govennnent, multiculturalism, and political parties. E-mail No assignment is to be submitted via e-mail unless previously approved. Also, I regularly check my e—mail, but sometimes I am unable to respond quickly. Please allow one to two days for an e-mail response. In addition, please limit your emails to questions about class topics. Any grievances involving the class must be handled during my office hours. Finally, make sure to check the syllabus or Blackboard first before sending an e—mail. In many cases they will answer your question. Grading The requirements will be three exams, which will be identification/short answer and essay. The final exam will be at the time designated by the University (see page 7). There will be short 2—3 page reaction papers about class topics and current events assigned throughout the semester, and periodic assignments via MyPoliSciLab. There will also be an individual presentation that you must sign up for outside of my office. Failure to sign up before January 21 will result in a 10 point reduction in your project grade. ['0 Late submissions for any assignment will only be accepted in extreme circumstances and at the discretion of the professor. If late submissions are accepted, they will be penalized one—half of a letter grade per day late (actual days, not class days). ' The grade breakdown is as follows: Gracie breakdown: Test 1: 20% Test 2: ' 20% Final Exam 20% Presentation 15 % Reaction Papers/ 15 % MyPoliSciLab assignments/Quizzes/Participation/Attendance 10% A 93-4 00 A— 90—92 B+ 87—89 B 83-86 B— 80—82 C+ 77-79 C 73—76 C- 70—72 D 60—69 F 0-59 A Note on Attendance, Participation, and Quizzes: Attendance in the class is required and expected whether or not a quiz will be given that day. Because the class will be geared towards your becoming productive citizens through your knowledge of American government, a portion of class will be set aside for a frank discussion of the contemporary political system and your opinions of it. As such, I strongly encourage participation and the sharing of appropriate and respectful views. While discussion is not a required element of the class, thoughtful participation will make the class more beneficial for all involved. It may also improve your final grade. Most importantly, be assured that your grades will not be adversely affected by any beliefs or ideas expressed in class or in assignments. Rather we will all respect the views of others when expressed in classroom discussions. Professionalism and Respect This is an academic environment. Therefore, I ask that you minimize unnecessary disruptions. This includes (but is not limited to) side conversations, cell phone calls, computer boot-up/shut down tones, reading of outside materials, and surfing outside websites. These actions unnecessarily distract the instructor and are disrespectful to other students trying to learn. if there are any issues of disrespect or a lack of professionalism by myself or another classmate please report it immediately. If you are deemed to be a disruption to the Class, I reserve the right to ask you to leave. Remember, your surfing (4.) Facebook or watching a movie is a distraction to theperson sitting next to you or behind you. If] am informed ofsacli a situation you may be required to leave your computer closed or in your baa for the remainder ofthe semester. Absences An absence from class will only be excused for illness or a University Spensored activity. Being untruthful about why you were absent is a violation of the University Honor Code. In the event of an absence, any missed assignment must be turned in immediately upon your return to class unless otherwise negotiated. Attendance quizzes cannot be made up, but 1f the absence is excmused it. will not count against your overall quiz grade. Procedures for Dealing with Grade/Evaluation Concerns Grade/evaluation concerns will only be considered if the following procedure is followed: All grade complaints must be TYPEB and must clearly express the student’s specific concerns. These written statements must be accompanied by citations of support from course materials, is readings, textbook, and/or lecture notes, in order to ensure accuracy. Written. statements will not be considered until three days AFTER the assignment is ' returned. This allows the student time to reread his/her answers and think carefully about what improvements could have been made. Grievances will not be considered once two weeks have passed. For example, if I return a graded assignment on Tuesday, the student must submit a complaint BEFDRE the Thursday of the following week. Once class is over on that Thursday, no complaints will be considered for that assignment. Since class time is limited, lwill only deal with questions or concerns during scheduled ofnce hours or by appointment Finally, submitting a grade grievance will result in a complete re- grade of the assignment and the new grade may be higher or lower than the original. Academic Dishonesty Academic Dishonesty is very serious as it affects the integrity of this course and. the University as a whole. You have all pledged to follow the honor code upon matriculation at the University of Richmond. Thus, academic dishonesty is not expected, and will not be tolerated. I will follow all guidelines established by the Honor Council for dealing with infractions. In addition, on each assignment you turn in you should write and sign the following statement: “Ipledge that] have neither given nor received assistance during the completion ofthis work.” Special Needs If you have a disability and may need accommodations of some kind in this course, please make an appointment to meet with me during the first two weeks of class. Please bring a copy of your official UR “Disability Accommodation Notice’ (DAN) form to give me at our meeting. See the “Disability Services” website mpg/studentdevelopment.richmond.edu/disabilfiy—services/ for more information. Academic and Personal Support Services It is strongly suggested that you avail yourselves of the myriad of support services offered by the University, especially the Speech and Writing Center. Changes to the Course The professor reserves the right to make changes to the syllabus in order to better facilitate the needs of the course. U: Course @ntiine Date I Subjects and Key Concepts Reading= gsg f_ Introduction, Review of Syllabus and J an 14 e, . expectations __A_i Chapter 1, Dahl Who Jan 1 6-21 Our Unique Experiment — Democracy, _ Governs and A ~ Republicanism, Liberalism Preface to _ Democratic Theory ' 4 The Origins of Our Democracy m Federalist Chapter 2’ Federalist Jan 23—30 Pa ers lO 94: 51 Constitution Papers 10 & 51 p t = = Via MyPoliSciLab Framers, Federalism, Connecticut . Chapter 2, pp 62—66, Compromise 78—83 The Evolving Face of America — J an 30 - Feb 4 immigration, Population Change, Chapter 4 _ Mobility _ Chapter 4, Hartz The Economy, Political Culture Libero! Tradition in _ America . # Feb 6 Test} Che, i, 2 «3: 4 Assessing the Public Mood — Public Opinion, Feb 11-25 Attitudes/Beliefs/Predispositions, Chapter 5 ' Demographic Differences Contemporary Opmion(Webs1tes), Polls Chapter 5 . Vs. Surveys ‘ Chapter 5, Key Margin of Error, Political Knowledge, Public Opinion and Party Identification, ideology American Democracy The Fourth Estate — Media, Democratic Chapter 6’ Anderson Feb 27 ~ Mar 4 i . South Park _ Functions, New VS. Old Media . Conservatives A Participatory Democracy — Voting Models, Chapter 10’ . , . . Anslabehere & Mar 6-18 Comparative Elections, Hlstory of The . . Iyengar Gomg Franchise , Negative _ Who Participates?, Campaigning, , Elections, and Voting Chapter 10 Mar 28 Test 2 Chs. 5, 6, & 10 Mar 25 _ A r O The Preeminent Branch — Representation Chapter 11, Mayhew p 0 Styles, Elections, Redistricting Congress: T he Read: on £95; Electoral Connection Institutions and Processes, “School Chapter 11’ Tate ,, Black Faces m the House Rock . Mirror The Modern President — Presidential Success, Chapter 12’ Neustadt Apr 10—15 D h - “ m A, 7. 7 , T, . 1 Presrdenrzof _l i res. vs. congress, immune-cu rresmency Power Struggles for Equality — Pro/Post Chapter 16’ Apr 15—1 7 ° . ernrnerman From Reconstruction, Protected Classes . . . L 7 Identzzjz to l‘3’olzz‘.zcs_j ' The Courts —~ Marbury in Madison, Structures 1_Chapter 14, Irons Apr 17-22 (Federal and State), Supreme Court, Brennan vs. Lu Judicial Activism |_ Rehrfluisr 9 w i . Culture Wet. PartyLSystezrs, SMSP V PR, Chapter 9’ Bu rnharn Apr 22—24 Party In Electorate, Government, . . . . . Critical Electrons Organization rrE/ray 3 — 2—5}: Final Exam C313. rr,r2,14,15,9 ...
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