Spanish empire

Militias are controlled by economic interests in the

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Unformatted text preview: ars. Not administered from its center, rather mediated by an official sanction from the center, an official who has been delegated NOT to make policy, but rather to resolve disputes. While this empire is integrated and maintained by ample naval power, there is next to no standing military/police power on the ground anywhere in the Spanish empire. Seems astonishing, a monopoly of coercion seems to be the definition of a modern state, which is missing in the Spanish Empire. Militias are controlled by economic interests in the Empire, such as the Merchant’s Militia in Mexico City. While the Merchants’ might have the same interests as the Crown, the majority of key militias in the Americas were mulattos, and how much would their interests fall in line with the Spanish? need to negotiate with them Guarani militias: only military force in the Guarani missions Thus, the Empire must negotiate with somebody to maintain control. In much of the empire, there are both merchant, artisan, mulattos, and (rare) indigenous militias. Empire far more integrated by mediation and negotiation than imposition. How? Particularly in its core regions, and even margins, the silver economy creates interests and opportunities that overarch other things. In the end, the gains of having access to the silver economy, outweigh the difficulties they all face increases likelihood of negotiation. In the far north/south, where there is no silver, the horses, tools, skills offered by the Spanish allows the same increased likelihood of negotiation. Must balance and integrate diverse interests. Perhaps because of all that mediation and negotiation, we aren’t entirely surprised...
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