Lab 1 - FL13 - ECE 198 JL - University of Illinois - Engineering Wiki

Lab 1 - FL13 - ECE 198 JL - University of Illinois - Engineering Wiki

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Lab 1 - FL13 Lab 1 assignment is due on Wednesday, August 28, Thursday, August 29, by 7pm in your svn repository. Introduction to Unix The purpose of this lab is to introduce you to the computing resources we will be using in ECE 198 JL this semester. Linux interface The computers in our classrooms are running Linux . Linux is a " Unix -like" operating system . An operating system is the most basic software running on a computer. It manages the computer's resources, controls peripherals, and executes applications . Other examples of operating systems are Windows and Mac OS. Unix was originally developed by Bell Labs in 1969 and has since split off into a variety of different operating systems which have been very significant in computing throughout the decades. The Linux computers in DCL 440 and DCL 520 as well as in Everitt 252 and Grainger 057 are managed by EWS . When you are logged in to an EWS Linux computer, it does not matter which particular computer you are sitting at; all of your personal files will remain the same. If you haven't already done so, log in to your computer using your netid and AD password. If you can't log in, let a TA or lab assistant know immediately. Graphical User Interface The desktop environment is based on the mouse, windows, and icons. You can double-click on an icon, like your home folder, and a window opens up showing the contents. Because of the graphical nature of the desktop environment, we call it a graphical user interface or GUI for short. Inside a folder, you will find some documents. You may also find more folders, which in turn have contents. This is the filesystem hierarchy . The filesystem is like a tree where each folder is a branch of the tree and the leaves are the documents. On a Unix system, folders are known as directories , and documents are known as files . Directories inside directories are called subdirectories . The GUI also gives you the ability to create files and directories. In your home directory, create a subdirectory called "part1". Open that directory and create a text file called "foo.txt". The GUI is designed to be intuitive, so we won't describe here how to do these things. The GUI has limitations, however. Anything that the GUI programmers thought of is easy to do. If you try to do something the GUI programmers didn't think of, however, the process can be painful. For example, create a subdirectory called "years" inside "part1". For each year from 1900 to the present year, create a file in "years" named after that year with ".txt" appended to the end. For example, the first three files should be named "1900.txt" "1901.txt" "1902.txt". Unless you like repetitive work, you don't have to create all of the files. Once you have seen how much time this would take, please stop and move on. Command Line Interface Most operating systems have an alternative interface, called a command line interface or CLI for short. In this interface, instead of telling the system what to do by clicking on icons, you give it text commands by typing them on the keyboard, and the computer responds in the same way with a textual response.
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Lab 1 - FL13 - ECE 198 JL - University of Illinois - Engineering Wiki

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