PSY201 9.20.13 To Post

2012 length of time in institutional care associated

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: e use, etc) associated with telomere length (Kananen et al., 2010; Keicolt-Glaser et al., 2011)   Exposure to violence associated with telomere length attrition from age 5 to age 10 (Shalev et al., 2012)   Length of time in institutional care associated with shorter telomere length in middle childhood (Bucharest Early Intervention Project: Drury et al., 2011)   Compared telomere length (measured via buccal cells) in children varying in early life risk   High-risk (n = 54): history of involvement with Child Protective Services, ongoing chronic stress   Low-risk (n = 38): recruited from the community, no history of involvement with Child Protective Services   Age at assessment: 4-5 years old 3 9/19/13 Telomere Length (T/S Ratio) 1.5 * 1 0.5 0 Low-risk High-risk n = 38 n = 51 Asok, Bernard, Roth, Rosen, & Dozier (2013)   PopulaIon 1: High ­risk children   Children involved in Child ProtecIve Services, with a host of other risk factors   PopulaIon 2: Low ­risk children in general For purposes of this example, we will pretend that: We randomly selected one high ­risk child to represent PopulaIon 1 We know the comparison sample characteris4cs of telomere length for low ­risk children in general   PopulaIon 1: High ­risk children   Children involved in Child ProtecIve Services, with a host of other risk factors   PopulaIon 2: Low ­risk children in general   For purposes of this example, we will pretend that:   We randomly selected one high ­risk child to represent PopulaIon 1   We know the comparison sample characteris4cs of telomere length for low ­risk children in general 4 9/19/13   PopulaIon 1: High ­risk children   Children involved in Child ProtecIve Services, with a host of other risk factors   PopulaIon 2: Low ­risk children in general   Research hypothesis: High ­risk children (Pop 1) have shorter telomeres than low ­risk children (Pop 2) ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 03/24/2014 for the course PSY 21201 taught by Professor Bernard during the Winter '13 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online