PSY201 9.20.13 To Post

07 standard devia4on 2 031 5 91913 mean 2 107

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Null hypothesis: High ­risk children (Pop 1) and low ­risk children (Pop 2) do not differ in their telomere length.   PopulaIon 1: High ­risk children   Children involved in Child ProtecIve Services, with a host of other risk factors   PopulaIon 2: Low ­risk children in general   Research hypothesis: μ1 < μ2   Null hypothesis: μ1 = μ2   PopulaIon 2: Low ­risk children in general Mean: μ2 = 1.07 Standard devia4on: σ2 = 0.31 5 9/19/13 Mean: μ2 = 1.07 Standard devia4on: σ2 = 0.31 0.31 0.45 0.76 1.07 1.38 1.69   For one ­tailed p < .05, criIcal Z score is  ­1.645 Let’s say that our randomly selected high ­risk child has a telomere length of 0.55. X = 0.55 μ2 = 1.07, σ2 = 0.31 Z = (X – μ)/SD = (0.55 – 1.07)/.31 =  ­1.677 Our sample’s score (our high ­risk kid): Z =  ­1.677 6 9/19/13 0.31 0.45 0.76 1.07 1.38 1.69 X = 0.55 Z =  ­1.677 Our Z score of  ­1.677 is more extreme than our criIcal value of  ­1.645. Thus, we can reject the null hypothesis. Our Z score of  ­1.677 is more extreme than our criIcal value of  ­1.645. Thus, we can reject the null hypothesis. •  Remember that p < .05 means that the probability of gekng a result this extreme if the null hypothesis is true is less than .05 (5%) •  In other words, it is VERY unlikely that the score for our high ­risk sample is equivalent with the set of scores from our low ­risk populaIon In summary, our study results support our research hypothesis. Our finding is sta4s4cally significant. •   Remember that we don’t use words like “prove” or “true” 7 9/19/13 Telomere Length (T/S Rat...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 03/24/2014 for the course PSY 21201 taught by Professor Bernard during the Winter '13 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online