PSY201 9.20.13 To Post

A researcher designs a new treatment for depression

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Unformatted text preview: .6 0.4 0.5 Low-risk (n = 38) 0.2 High-risk (n = 51) 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 Parental Responsiveness   Low risk High risk Asok, Bernard, Roth, Rosen, & Dozier (In press) Direc4onal hypotheses   One ­tailed test   E.g., PopulaIon 1 (like the sample studied) has a higher (or lower) mean than the populaIon in general   Non ­direc4onal hypotheses   Two ­tailed test   SIll predicIng a difference between PopulaIon 1 and PopulaIon 2, but no parIcular direcIon of difference is predicted 9 9/19/13   Two ­tailed test rejects null when obtained value too extreme in either direcIon   We specify two direcIons for rejecIon of the null hypothesis   One ­tailed test rejects null if obtained value is too low (or too high)   We only set aside one direc4on for rejec4on of the null hypothesis   Decide before collecIng data   Direc4onal hypothesis (one ­tailed test) or non ­ direc4onal hypothesis (two ­tailed test)?   If one ­tailed, which “tail” (negaIve/lep or posiIve/ right) do you care about? A researcher designs a new treatment for depression involving exposure to the paIent’s worst childhood memories. On one hand, this might decrease depression (similar to how exposure to feared sImuli reduces anxiety). On the other hand, this might increase depression (as ruminaIon or repeIIve thinking about negaIve situaIons can increase depressive symptoms). The researcher wonders about how this treatment will influence scores on a depression checklist.   Direc4onal hypothesis (one ­tailed test) or non ­ direc4onal hypothesis (two ­tailed test)?   If one ­tailed, which “tail” (negaIve/lep or posiIve/ right) do you care about? A professor thinks that accessing review materials for a...
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This note was uploaded on 03/24/2014 for the course PSY 21201 taught by Professor Bernard during the Winter '13 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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