Cold_War-Proxy_Wars_Activity.docx - Name Period Objective...

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Name: Period: Objective: Explore different proxy wars during the Cold War Directions: Read the text and examine the map below then answer the question that follows Introduction: Cold War Hot Spots Though the United States and the Soviet Union never fought one another directly, conflicts between their allies, and those involving one of the two superpowers took place throughout the Cold War all over the world. These types of conflicts are called proxy wars . A proxy is a person that represents someone else . In the Cold War, allies of the United States and Soviet Union were their proxies. Below are examples of four Cold War conflicts. Cold War: Proxy Wars Directions: Read about the following events of the Cold War, and watch the videos to help you answer the questions 1. 1950-1953: Korean War Watch the video Simple History: Korean War and read the text below The Korean War was a conflict that started between communist North Korea and South Korea in 1950, but soon became a proxy war between the USSR and the United States. In 1910, the Japanese invaded Korea, subjecting the Koreans to a violent and repressive rule that attempted to replace Korean culture with Japanese. Like European imperial countries, the Japanese used Korean natural resources to further the growth of their empire and sold Japanese-made goods to Koreans. Koreans resisted Japanese rule through efforts like the March First Movement whose protests gained some freedoms for the Korean people, but Japanese military rule was strong throughout the occupation. After defeating Germany in World War II, the United States and USSR agreed to focus both of their efforts on Japan. The Soviets invaded Japan-occupied China and Korea from the north as the US fought the Japanese in the Pacific. Following the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the Japanese surrender in August 1945, the Soviet Union and United States occupied Korea much like they divided Europe. The Soviets controlled Korea north of the 38th Parallel of latitude and the US controlled the peninsula south of that line. Map of Korea Today Map of the divided Korea without labels Image is courtesy of wikimedia commons Unresolved Global Conflict (1945-1991)-Proxy Wars “The 38th Parallel,” the line of latitude that divides North and South Korea
Two Korean political groups came to power after World War II. The first which was in the north and led by a man named Kim Il-sung were communist revolutionaries who fought against the Japanese and were supported by fellow communists in the People’s Republic of China and the Soviet Union. The other group were called “ultranationalists” and were led by Syngman Rhee, a Korean who was exiled from the country during Japanese rule and educated in and supported by the United States. Eventually, Kim Il-sung became the leader of a communist North Korea and Syngman Rhee became the president of the south.

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