De ve lo p me n t in th e th ird w o rld b so cia lis

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Unformatted text preview: viduals was expected to be guaranteed in the nam e of: a . De ve lo p me n t in th e Th ird w o rld b . So cia lis m in th e Th ird w o rld . c. De ve lo p me n t in th e W e s t. d . Mo d e rn is a tio n in th e E a s te rn Blo c. e .No t Atte mp te d 41. Dem ands for recognition of identities can be viewed: a . P o s itive ly a n d n e g a tive ly. b . As lib e ra tio n mo ve me n ts a n d milita n t a ctio n . c. As e ffo rts to re d is co ve r cu ltu ra l ro o ts w h ich ca n s lid e to w a rd s in to le ra n ce o f o th e rs . d . All o f th e a b o ve . e .No t Atte mp te d 42. Going by the author's expos ition of the nature of identity, which of the following s tatem ents is untrue? a . Id e n tity re p re s e n ts cre a tin g u n ifo rm g ro u p s o u t o f d is p a ra te p e o p le . b . Id e n tity is a n e ce s s ity in th e ch a n g in g w o rld . c. Id e n tity is a co g n itive n e ce s s ity. d . No n e o f th e a b o ve . e .No t Atte mp te d 43. According to the author, the nation-s tate a . h a s fu lfille d its p o te n tia l. b . is w illin g to d o a n yth in g to p re s e rve o rd e r. c. g e n e ra te s s e cu rity fo r a ll its citiz e n s . d . h a s b e e n a ma jo r fo rce in p re ve n tin g civil a n d in te rn a tio n a l w a rs . e .No t Atte mp te d 44. Which of the following views of the nation-s tate cannot be attributed to the author? a . It h a s n o t g u a ra n te e d p e a ce a n d s e cu rity. b . It ma y g o a s fa r a s g e n o cid e fo r s e lfp re s e rva tio n . c. It re p re s e n ts th e d e ma n d s o f co mmu n itie s w ith in it. d . It is u n a b le to p re ve n t in te rn a tio n a l w a rs . e .No t Atte mp te d PASSAGE V The pers is tent patterns in the way nations fight reflect their cultural and his torical traditions and deeply rooted attitudes that collectively m ake up their s trategic culture. Thes e patterns provide ins ights that go beyond what can be learnt jus t by com paring arm am ents and divis ions . In the Vietnam War, the s trategic tradition of the United States called for forcing the enem y to fight a m as s ed battle in an open area, where s uperior Am erican weapons would prevail. The United States was trying to re-fight World War II in the jungles of Southeas t As ia, agains t an enem y with no intention of doing s o. Som e Britis h m ilitary his torians des cribe the As ian way of war as one of indirect attacks , avoiding frontal attacks m eant to overpower an opponent. This traces back to As ian his tory and geography: the great dis tances and hars h terrain have often m ade it difficult to execute the s ort of open field clas hes allowed by the flat terrain and relatively com pact s ize of Europe. A very different s trategic tradition aros e in As ia. The bow and arrow were m etaphors for an Eas tern way of war. By its nature, the arrow is an indirect weapon. Fired from a dis tance of hundreds of yards , it does not neces s itate im m ediate phys ical contact with the ene...
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This document was uploaded on 03/23/2014.

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