CAT2003 SECTION - ENGLISH _ CAT4MBA - CAT4MBA HOM E NOTES...

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CAT4MBA Log in Register | Forgot passw ord? HOME NOTES FORUM MOCK AND FLT ENGLISH ZONE STUDENTS CORNER Please Log in or Register to take this FLT. Home CAT2003 SECTION - ENGLISH Tag: Exam Papers / Instructions 1. The test comprises of 50 questions. You should complete the test within 40 minutes. 2. There is only one correct answer to each question. 3. All questions carry four marks each. 4. Each wrong answer will attract a penalty of one mark. Directions Questions 1-30: Each of the five passages given below is followed by five questions. Choose the best answer to each question. PASSAGE I At the heart of the enormous boom in wine consumption that has taken place in the English-speaking world over the last two decades or so is a fascinating, happy paradox. In the days when wine was exclusively the preserve of a narrow cultural elite, bought either at auctions or from gentleman wine merchants in wing collars and bow ties, to be stored in rambling cellars and decanted to order by one's butler, the ordinary drinker didn't get a look-in. Wine was considered a highly technical subject, in which anybody without the necessary ability could only fall flat on his or her face in embarrassment. It wasn't just that you needed a refined aesthetic sensibility for the stuff if it wasn't to be hopelessly wasted on you. It required an intimate knowledge of what came from where, and what it was supposed to taste like. Those were times, however, when wine appreciation essentially meant a familiarity with the great French classics, with perhaps a smattering of other wines -- like sherry and port. That was what the wine trade dealt in. These days, wine is bought daily in supermarkets and high-street chains to be consumed that evening, hardly anybody has a cellar to store it in and most don't even possess a decanter. Above all, the wines of literally dozens of countries are available on our market. When a supermarket offers its customers a couple of fruity little numbers from Brazil, we scarcely raise an eyebrow. It seems, in other words, that the commercial jungle that wine has now become has not in the slightest deterred people from plunging adventurously into the thickets in order to taste and see. Consumers are no longer intimidated by the thought of needing to know their Pouilly-Fume from their Pouilly-Fuisse, just at the very moment when there is more to know than ever before. The reason for this new mood of confidence is not hard to find. It is on every wine label from Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the United States: the name of the grape from which the wine is made. At one time that might have sounded like a fairly technical approach in itself. Why should native English-speakers know what Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay were? The answer lies in the popularity that wines made from those grape varieties now enjoy. Consumers effectively recognize them as brand names, and have acquired a basic lexicon of wine that can serve them even when confronted with those Brazilian upstarts.
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CAT2003 SECTION - ENGLISH _ CAT4MBA - CAT4MBA HOM E NOTES...

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