L03_9_Sept_Systems_Diagrams_and_Formation_Age_Earth

Rate of delivery z kgm3 a m3year az kgyear 43

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Unformatted text preview: age range: 20 million years (youngest) 400 million years (oldest) 37 The ‘salt’ clock Edmund Halley (1656- 1742) (namesake of Halley’s comet) How much ;me did it take for oceans to afain present ‘sal;ness’? The basic idea: rivers introduce salts into the ocean. As ocean water evaporates, the salt stays behind. The amount of salt must be related to the age of the oceans. 38 The ‘salt’ clock Assume ini;al water was ‘fresh’ (no salt) Need to know: Salt concentra;on of oceans, volume of oceans Average salt concentra;on in global river waters Flux (volume per unit ;me) of river water into the oceans 39 The mathema;cs of the salt clock method X = salt concentra;on of oceans (let the units be kg salt per m3 water: kg/m3) Y = volume of ocean (units: m3) What is the total salt content of the oceans? 40 The mathema;cs of the salt clock method X = salt concentra;on of oceans (let the units be kg salt per m3 water: kg/m3) Y = volume of ocean (units: m3) What is the total salt content of the oceans? Salt content = X kg/m3 * Y m3 = XY kg 41 The mathema;cs of the salt clock method X = salt concentra;on of oceans (let the units be kg salt per m3 water: kg/m3) Y = volume of ocean (units: m3) What is the total salt content of the oceans? Salt content = X kg/m3 * Y m3 = XY kg Z = salt concentra;on of river waters (kg/m3) A = global flux of river waters to oceans (m3/year) What is the rate of delivery of sa...
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This document was uploaded on 03/26/2014 for the course GEC AS.270.103 at Johns Hopkins.

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