gish_jen_whos_irish - Joetta Appiah Sara Hallisey ENG-102...

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Joetta Appiah Sara Hallisey ENG-102 11/03/21 Gish Jen's Who's Irish A stereotype is a fixed, over generalized belief about a specific group or class of individuals. By stereotyping we deduce that an individual has an entire scope of attributes and capacities that we expect all individuals from that group to have. Throughout Gish Jen’s story, Who’s Irish?, she uses character development to highlight cultural differences. From the beginning of the story we see that the narrator, Sophie's grandmother, sees the world through a different cultural lense. She talks about social norms in China and how they differ in America. At one point in the story, the grandmother says, “We do not have this word in Chinese, supportive” (106). This is a very stereotypical statement because Chinese people aren’t known for being affectionate because it’s not a part of the culture. Her Chinese culture is all that she knows, and therefore, she can come off as unsupportive when she isn’t trying to be. This is one cultural difference that is highlighted by the grandmother’s character development. Gish Jen's 'Who is Irish?' is an imaginative non fiction exposition described by a Chinese- American immigrant grandma. She discusses her relationship with her girl, granddaughter, and the Irish family 'Shea' her girl wedded into. Sophie, her granddaughter, has 'wild' conduct, which incorporates removing her garments out in the open, kicking grown-ups and being difficult. The storyteller principally pins the reason for this conduct on her 'Shea side' and accepts whipping
ought to be implemented. Natalie, Sophie's mom, is against beating. One day at the recreation center, Sophie would not emerge from an opening, so her grandma jabs in with a stick. Sophie's folks were stunned to discover her wounded, and Sophie uncovered to her folks that her grandma had punished her previously. The grandma is kicked out of the house, moves in with her girl's mother by marriage and does not appear with Sophie.

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