IR Lecture -- April 11_Latin America a rising regional regime

IR Lecture -- April 11_Latin America a rising regional regime

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Introduction to International Relations (PLSC 111) Professor Jolyon Howorth Latin America: a Rising Regional Regime? 11 April 2006 1. Latin America: the Basics Very recent nations (1820s to 1840s) Asymmetry between LA and the USA There is a great difference Failure of unity/federation Political volatility Is still a question today – see the elections in Peru. Economic anomalies There is wealth there, but it has never done well. Has resources There has been much European immigration, and much racial mixing. 2. US Hegemony: Myth or Reality? 1823: Monroe Doctrine (toothless tiger…) Was an attempt to tell European powers to stay out of North America. Was toothless bc US couldn’t stop Europe from taking back Latin Amer. 19th c: European economic domination 19th century, South America dominated by Europe economics. 1890s: US challenges UK over Venezuela Post-WWI: US dominates LA economy European colonisalism removed after World War Attempts to create FTAA… 3. Political Volatility Conservative/authoritarian/military govts until mid-20th c. Populism 1940s to 1960s/70s Military dictatorships 1970/80s – They were largely backed by the US CIA. End of CW: gradual restoration democracy 2000s: rise of “left-wing” governments – Like Lula da Silva 2003 Brazil, Nestor Kirchner 2003, is a seudo socialist reform. Hugo Chavez 1998, Eva Morales in Bolivia. Latin America has had governments of the right, and leftist movements are a reaction against that. , as they are going left now. 4. Economic Anomalies
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LA rich in raw materials, minerals, agricultural land Coffee, minerals, ard land Considerable Euro. investment 19th.c. 1880s-1930s: LA thriving & booming Argentina in top 10, Venezula is an oil giant Feudal land holding systems Mercantilist states Narrow elites Persistence exports from primary sector. Inadequate manufacturing industry Huge inequalities Persistent debt crises Brazil = #9 in world in 2006 Brazil has incredible inequality. FIVE PRINCIPLES OF OPPRESSION Corpoatism State mercantilism Privilege Bottom up wealth redistribution Political law.
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