Wetland Conservation Research Paper 2 - Digging or Draining...

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Digging or Draining Wetlands, Is It Right?
soil then, being covered with water, is characterized by frequent, prolonged saturation and low oxygen content, which leads to anaerobic chemical environments . Due to these conditions the soil usually has a low iron concentration. Even though this type of soil is required for an area to be classified as a wetland, there is also dry land that covers the area. Since a majority of the land has low oxygen levels and is covered in water, this creates an environment for a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic organisms.Wetlands are home to a vast variety of species including many water fowl and anaerobic microorganisms. Some of these organisms may live under the water, but none of them are deep water dwellers and generally spend their life spans near the surface of the water. The vegetation in a wetland is also unique. “Plants adapted for growing in standing water or saturated soils, such as moss, sedges, reeds, and horsetail, rice, mangroves, cypress, and cranberries are some examples” . These types of vegetation have changed over many years so that they will thrive in

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